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German WWII Dornier bomber lifted from sea off England

Started by Bronx, June 15, 2013, 11:39:21 PM

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Bronx

People sleep peacefully at night because there are a few tough men prepared to do violence on their behalf.

A foolish man complains about his torn pockets.

A wise man uses it to scratch his balls.

TboneAgain

Interesting, though I'm sure they would have liked a little more airplane after all that effort. (Incidentally, in the salvage photo, what's left is hanging upside down, and it is not "missing a wing" as the story states, but rather missing the outboard sections of both wings and apparently the entire tail assembly and a good bit of the fuselage.) After more than 70 years of salt water and barnacles, I guess you can't expect much.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; IT IS FORCE. -- George Washington

Bronx

Quote from: TboneAgain on June 16, 2013, 03:21:16 AM
Interesting, though I'm sure they would have liked a little more airplane after all that effort. (Incidentally, in the salvage photo, what's left is hanging upside down, and it is not "missing a wing" as the story states, but rather missing the outboard sections of both wings and apparently the entire tail assembly and a good bit of the fuselage.) After more than 70 years of salt water and barnacles, I guess you can't expect much.

So you don't think airplane glue or duck tape will do the job...?           :lol:
People sleep peacefully at night because there are a few tough men prepared to do violence on their behalf.

A foolish man complains about his torn pockets.

A wise man uses it to scratch his balls.

TboneAgain

Quote from: Bronx on June 16, 2013, 06:04:31 AM
So you don't think airplane glue or duck tape will do the job...?           :lol:

Glue and tape work fairly well when there are at least two pieces to attach to one another. That old Dornier probably went to pieces when it hit the water, and it's unlikely the rest of it will ever be found. No cockpit or bombardier bay glass, no engines, no props, no tail, no wings outboard of the engine nacelles, no landing gear... I think I'd be headed to the scrapyard with it.

Five weeks of prep, who knows what it took to find it, then the actual lift itself and all that labor and equipment -- for what looks to me like maybe half a ton of scrap aluminum. No surprise that the entire project was funded by the British government -- taxpayers.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; IT IS FORCE. -- George Washington

mdgiles

Quote from: TboneAgain on June 16, 2013, 06:16:01 AM
Glue and tape work fairly well when there are at least two pieces to attach to one another. That old Dornier probably went to pieces when it hit the water, and it's unlikely the rest of it will ever be found. No cockpit or bombardier bay glass, no engines, no props, no tail, no wings outboard of the engine nacelles, no landing gear... I think I'd be headed to the scrapyard with it.

Five weeks of prep, who knows what it took to find it, then the actual lift itself and all that labor and equipment -- for what looks to me like maybe half a ton of scrap aluminum. No surprise that the entire project was funded by the British government -- taxpayers.
Did they find any identification, so they could tell whether the crew got out. Not that I particularly care, but the idea of the crew sitting in a POW camp in Canada, for six years, cursing Goerring for the fat, stupid, drugged up clown he was, appeals to me.
"LIBERALS: their willful ignorance is rivaled only by their catastrophic stupidity"!

TboneAgain

Quote from: mdgiles on June 24, 2013, 12:39:33 AM
Did they find any identification, so they could tell whether the crew got out. Not that I particularly care, but the idea of the crew sitting in a POW camp in Canada, for six years, cursing Goerring for the fat, stupid, drugged up clown he was, appeals to me.

I share your sentiments about the Generalfeldmarschall. On the other hand, the Do17 was an excellent example of the sort of aircraft that suited the German style of sub-continental "blitzkrieg" warfare. Medium range, lightweight, lightly armed and manned, fairly speedy. The only better examples I can think of were the Heinkel 111 and maybe the Ju87 Stuka. (The Stuka, while effective in the early stages of the war, loses a lot of points for being pitifully slow.)
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; IT IS FORCE. -- George Washington

Murph

Quote from: TboneAgain on June 24, 2013, 06:31:04 AM
I share your sentiments about the Generalfeldmarschall. On the other hand, the Do17 was an excellent example of the sort of aircraft that suited the German style of sub-continental "blitzkrieg" warfare. Medium range, lightweight, lightly armed and manned, fairly speedy. The only better examples I can think of were the Heinkel 111 and maybe the Ju87 Stuka. (The Stuka, while effective in the early stages of the war, loses a lot of points for being pitifully slow.)

The He 111 was not particularly fast in comparison to others such as the Ju 88, which was used as a level bomber, dive bomber, and night fighter, like the Do 17 / 217. 

TboneAgain

Quote from: Murph on June 24, 2013, 10:42:05 AM
The He 111 was not particularly fast in comparison to others such as the Ju 88, which was used as a level bomber, dive bomber, and night fighter, like the Do 17 / 217.

Early in the war, the Do17 was relatively fast compared to the planes sent against it. It was slower than the Ju88, certainly, but so were many of the fighters of the day. I stand by what I said, though the Do17 fell out of favor for obvious reasons (underpowered) early on.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; IT IS FORCE. -- George Washington

mdgiles

Quote from: TboneAgain on June 24, 2013, 06:31:04 AM
I share your sentiments about the Generalfeldmarschall. On the other hand, the Do17 was an excellent example of the sort of aircraft that suited the German style of sub-continental "blitzkrieg" warfare. Medium range, lightweight, lightly armed and manned, fairly speedy. The only better examples I can think of were the Heinkel 111 and maybe the Ju87 Stuka. (The Stuka, while effective in the early stages of the war, loses a lot of points for being pitifully slow.)
The Luftwaffe quickly found that if they didn't destroy the enemy's planes on the ground - like they had done often early in the war - their bombers were vulnerable to an air force with fighters that were the equal of theirs. In any case these bombers displaced a weakness that would prove disastrous to the Nazis later on, lack of a four engined, long ranged, heavy bomber. Which would have allowed the Nazis to reach the Soviet industrial areas near, and beyond, the Urals.
"LIBERALS: their willful ignorance is rivaled only by their catastrophic stupidity"!