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Retaining Wall from concrete bags

Started by Solars Toy, January 05, 2022, 03:47:24 AM

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Solars Toy

I find this sort of fascinating. This would be easier than laying a bunch of blocks.  They recommend that you pound rebar through before you water it down.

https://www.core77.com/posts/80454/An-Easy-Way-to-Build-Retaining-Walls-Leave-the-Concrete-in-the-Bag-Stack-Like-Legos-Wet-With-a-Hose

Toy
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Bronx

Wow...pretty ingenious. Thanks for sharing this idea with us.
People sleep peacefully at night because there are a few tough men prepared to do violence on their behalf.

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A wise man uses it to scratch his balls.

Solar

One point. I found it's better to drive some rebar in before you add water, depending on the ground you're trying to maintain.

Drive a rod into the ground, bend it over and stack bags on top, they can't shift or slide.
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TboneAgain

Quote from: Solar on January 21, 2022, 01:28:45 AMOne point. I found it's better to drive some rebar in before you add water, depending on the ground you're trying to maintain.

Drive a rod into the ground, bend it over and stack bags on top, they can't shift or slide.
I saw this idea somewhere else on the interwebs. I guess it's probably cheaper and faster than those landscaping pavers, which would have to be drilled to accommodate pinning.

I'm wondering... Do you paint the finished product? Does Toy get to pick off all that yellow and black paper, or does she make you do it? (Sounds like an EXCELLENT project for grandkids!) Or do you adjust to sitting in your new space reading QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE ????
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

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Solar

Quote from: TboneAgain on January 22, 2022, 08:47:42 AMI saw this idea somewhere else on the interwebs. I guess it's probably cheaper and faster than those landscaping pavers, which would have to be drilled to accommodate pinning.

I'm wondering... Do you paint the finished product? Does Toy get to pick off all that yellow and black paper, or does she make you do it? (Sounds like an EXCELLENT project for grandkids!) Or do you adjust to sitting in your new space reading QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE QUIKRETE ????
Just throw some diesel on it and watch it burn. :biggrin:

I did it years ago, in fact, my county does this on most of our back roads, and most of the paper disappears within a year.
Why you say?  :laugh:
Animals use it to nest. :cool:
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TboneAgain

Quote from: Solar on January 22, 2022, 09:55:33 AMJust throw some diesel on it and watch it burn. :biggrin:

I did it years ago, in fact, my county does this on most of our back roads, and most of the paper disappears within a year.
Why you say?  :laugh:
Animals use it to nest. :cool:
I spent decades working my state's highways and byways, from little township roads to interstate highways. On the larger jobs, we would often need to place what we called "barrier wall" to separate live traffic from our work zone. That stuff is sometimes called "PCB" and sometimes "Jersey barrier" or "Jersey wall," but it's all the same. Two-ton slabs of wire-reinforced concrete wall strung together with steel links.

One discovery I made on a job while removing some of this barrier wall that had been in place for several months -- it is home for critters! Not only do snakes and other reptiles use the gaps between the pieces for shelter at night, but even underneath!

Those wall sections are cast in molds. The molds are set upside-down so that each section of wall is poured top down. When each mold is almost full, a grid of lumber is set on the box form in order to create drainage channels in the bottom of each piece of wall.

Those drainage channels help rain runoff from the pavement alongside to get away beneath the wall section. But there are parts of those drainage channels that don't normally get wet when it rains.

Field mice, one of the most adaptable mammal species on the planet, find those dry bits of channel under those two-ton slabs and build nests and have babies and raise families. While constructing their nesting chambers and living rooms and parlors, those mice seek out the finest materials available for the task.

MANY is the time I've been on hand when a piece of barrier wall was "picked," or lifted off its spot, only to watch a half dozen mice scurry in different directions. We had popped the roof off their condo. Too often, we found abandoned mouse babies squirming in makeshift nests.

I was always impressed with the size and complexity of those mouse houses under our barrier wall. But I was even more amazed by the raw material the mice used, almost to the exclusion of anything else, for making their nests.

They used cigarette butts. They collected tar-stained cigarette filters discarded by the millions along the road from passing cars, stripped off the paper, fluffed and dried the cellulose fibers, and used them to make their little houses. The first time I found one of these nests, I wondered what the material was, but all I had to do was sniff the ashtray stench to know.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; IT IS FORCE. -- George Washington

Solar

Quote from: TboneAgain on January 22, 2022, 10:29:18 AMI spent decades working my state's highways and byways, from little township roads to interstate highways. On the larger jobs, we would often need to place what we called "barrier wall" to separate live traffic from our work zone. That stuff is sometimes called "PCB" and sometimes "Jersey barrier" or "Jersey wall," but it's all the same. Two-ton slabs of wire-reinforced concrete wall strung together with steel links.

One discovery I made on a job while removing some of this barrier wall that had been in place for several months -- it is home for critters! Not only do snakes and other reptiles use the gaps between the pieces for shelter at night, but even underneath!

Those wall sections are cast in molds. The molds are set upside-down so that each section of wall is poured top down. When each mold is almost full, a grid of lumber is set on the box form in order to create drainage channels in the bottom of each piece of wall.

Those drainage channels help rain runoff from the pavement alongside to get away beneath the wall section. But there are parts of those drainage channels that don't normally get wet when it rains.

Field mice, one of the most adaptable mammal species on the planet, find those dry bits of channel under those two-ton slabs and build nests and have babies and raise families. While constructing their nesting chambers and living rooms and parlors, those mice seek out the finest materials available for the task.

MANY is the time I've been on hand when a piece of barrier wall was "picked," or lifted off its spot, only to watch a half dozen mice scurry in different directions. We had popped the roof off their condo. Too often, we found abandoned mouse babies squirming in makeshift nests.

I was always impressed with the size and complexity of those mouse houses under our barrier wall. But I was even more amazed by the raw material the mice used, almost to the exclusion of anything else, for making their nests.

They used cigarette butts. They collected tar-stained cigarette filters discarded by the millions along the road from passing cars, stripped off the paper, fluffed and dried the cellulose fibers, and used them to make their little houses. The first time I found one of these nests, I wondered what the material was, but all I had to do was sniff the ashtray stench to know.
I've been looking for a few of those to place at my campsite to divert flood waters, but no one ever seems to part with them. :glare:
Yeah, mice are far more industrious than most humans, they'll nest in the damndest places, anything parked, like truck engines. :lol:
Every winter I find them in our staked firewood, though the cats had already evicted the residents, thankfully, or the snakes before hibernation.
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Quote from: Solar on January 22, 2022, 11:04:22 AMI've been looking for a few of those to place at my campsite to divert flood waters, but no one ever seems to part with them. :glare:
Yeah, mice are far more industrious than most humans, they'll nest in the damndest places, anything parked, like truck engines. :lol:
Every winter I find them in our staked firewood, though the cats had already evicted the residents, thankfully, or the snakes before hibernation.
If you can find a highway construction company near you....

In my experience, wall sections that have been struck by traffic and "cracked" are retired as being defective for their intended purpose. Many are simply buried in nearby waste sites. But if they survive, they can often be had on the cheap, depending on the deal you can make.

Usually, the real sticker is the cost of transport. It's invariably expensive to pay somebody to haul a two-ton chunk of busted-up wall from where it landed to where you want it. Many times, people who have no means to move the wall can realize a serious bargain by negotiating a relatively small payment to the construction company for moving and unloading (or even placing) busted pieces of wall. They do it every day, and tend to see it as no biggie.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; IT IS FORCE. -- George Washington

Solar

Quote from: TboneAgain on January 22, 2022, 01:38:31 PMIf you can find a highway construction company near you....

In my experience, wall sections that have been struck by traffic and "cracked" are retired as being defective for their intended purpose. Many are simply buried in nearby waste sites. But if they survive, they can often be had on the cheap, depending on the deal you can make.

Usually, the real sticker is the cost of transport. It's invariably expensive to pay somebody to haul a two-ton chunk of busted-up wall from where it landed to where you want it. Many times, people who have no means to move the wall can realize a serious bargain by negotiating a relatively small payment to the construction company for moving and unloading (or even placing) busted pieces of wall. They do it every day, and tend to see it as no biggie.
Excellent idea!
Granted, they're in Sacramento, I can haul them, but Hell, if they're willing to dump them for free at my place?
I'll build a damn bunker as well.
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TboneAgain

Quote from: Solar on January 22, 2022, 09:38:42 PMExcellent idea!
Granted, they're in Sacramento, I can haul them, but Hell, if they're willing to dump them for free at my place?
I'll build a damn bunker as well.
Bunkers is good!   :tounge: 

Over a lot of years on the road, I've set probably hundreds of miles of that wall, and I can tell you this: I was never permitted to set a piece of wall that had even one crack. And I've been employed on many occasions to remove sections that had been impacted by the stray vehicle. I never asked about where it was being taken, but I've personally seen a lot of it being buried in waste sites.

Portland cement concrete is wonderful stuff, but it tends to be distressingly permanent and difficult to get rid of.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

Government is not reason; it is not eloquent; IT IS FORCE. -- George Washington

Solar

Quote from: TboneAgain on January 23, 2022, 04:02:33 AMBunkers is good!  :tounge: 

Over a lot of years on the road, I've set probably hundreds of miles of that wall, and I can tell you this: I was never permitted to set a piece of wall that had even one crack. And I've been employed on many occasions to remove sections that had been impacted by the stray vehicle. I never asked about where it was being taken, but I've personally seen a lot of it being buried in waste sites.

Portland cement concrete is wonderful stuff, but it tends to be distressingly permanent and difficult to get rid of.
I'll be making calls to see if Teichert or Granite construction are getting rid of any, I have room for a hundred or so. :biggrin:
Rebuild my dam, build a bunker and divert flooding, I would be a happy guy.
The quarry near me is selling a 15 ton diesel backhoe bucket loader for 4 grand, runs great, just doesn't meet Ca air standards so it has to go.

Oh, and did you ever check out govplanet.com? Tons of deals, just have to be the only bidder. :biggrin:
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