Author Topic: 10 Common Mistakes That Native English Speakers Make  (Read 186 times)

Offline milos

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10 Common Mistakes That Native English Speakers Make
« on: January 30, 2017, 07:14:30 AM »
This is literally a higher mathematics to me.



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Online Solar

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Re: 10 Common Mistakes That Native English Speakers Make
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2017, 08:41:45 AM »
He's absolutely correct! I cringe when I hear the English language being bastardized like this, be it street or ghetto slang, to kids trying to be cool.
Problem is, these misspeaks can easily become part of our language to the point they become accepted and when someone speaks clear English, they are somehow viewed as outcasts, in some cases, people assume they're being snobs and purposely insulting.

I was raised by parents from the turn of the 19th century, where everyone spoke and wrote the English language with uniformity, so as to be certain language was not misinterpreted.
While today we have all kinds of slang dialects within a given city, from gang to street, to broken English because of immigration, and the dim party encourages it with "Press #1 for English".

So don't feel bad, grasping these can take a near lifetime if you weren't raised with people that insisted on proper English.

Sad thing is, people, don't realize just how it reflects upon them personally in their daily lives.
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Offline milos

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Re: 10 Common Mistakes That Native English Speakers Make
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2017, 03:50:38 AM »
As a non-native English speaker, I freak out when I see people intentionally mix "their", "there", and "they're", or "your" and "you're", because they think it's cool. I have been learning English for nine years in school, and in some courses later, to be able to write it properly, but still wasn't able to master it, and now I see native English speakers intentionally ruining it, and when I see them doing this I just want to punch them in the face, this time really literally, if I just could reach them. While some people are putting their efforts to learn something properly, the others are putting their efforts to ruin it.

Although the English is usually considered to be one of the easiest languages to learn, when you look deep into it, it's not that easy at all. Whether to use indefinite or definite article, or not to use them; differencies between British and American English (ok, I know it's parking lot and not car park so far); meaning of some words, why "good" is not the same as "well", when to say "little" and when to say "small"; we who have learned French also have some spelling problems, for example why is it "ind├ępendance" in French, but "independence" in English; and tenses of course, they are so confusing I will never learn to use them properly, it's a real nightmare, especially the Future Continuous Perfect Past Participle Present Tense, never been able to figure it out. :wink:
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Re: 10 Common Mistakes That Native English Speakers Make
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2017, 06:55:20 AM »
As a non-native English speaker, I freak out when I see people intentionally mix "their", "there", and "they're", or "your" and "you're", because they think it's cool. I have been learning English for nine years in school, and in some courses later, to be able to write it properly, but still wasn't able to master it, and now I see native English speakers intentionally ruining it, and when I see them doing this I just want to punch them in the face, this time really literally, if I just could reach them. While some people are putting their efforts to learn something properly, the others are putting their efforts to ruin it.

Although the English is usually considered to be one of the easiest languages to learn, when you look deep into it, it's not that easy at all. Whether to use indefinite or definite article, or not to use them; differencies between British and American English (ok, I know it's parking lot and not car park so far); meaning of some words, why "good" is not the same as "well", when to say "little" and when to say "small"; we who have learned French also have some spelling problems, for example why is it "ind├ępendance" in French, but "independence" in English; and tenses of course, they are so confusing I will never learn to use them properly, it's a real nightmare, especially the Future Continuous Perfect Past Participle Present Tense, never been able to figure it out. :wink:
There's no excuse for it in the written word, but when I hear "yer" spoken I tend to brush it off as, maybe it was say a Southern dialect, where they may actually be saying your, or you're, but when it happens with the written word, to me it's inexcusable, especially with all the grammar programs available for free.
Koolaid is for kids, TEA is for adults

 

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