Author Topic: The Johnson Amendment and the Tax Exempt Status of Churches  (Read 891 times)

Offline carlb

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It seems even conservatives gradually accept the unacceptable once it's near universally accepted. The frog in the kettle thing I guess.

But if you really believe in the mythical separation of Church and State, why do you believe the State can DICTATE what can be preached in the pulpit?

The TRUTH is, the Church can speak out on the affairs of government, but the government isn't allowed (by th4e First Amendment) to interfere with the Church.  Remember, the Constitution ONLY exists to define the limits of the State.

Now understand how the libs got you to accept this Tax exempt myth:

Quote
October 2nd across America will be Pulpit Freedom Sunday. Pastors will be free to speak in such a way to defy what’s called the Johnson Amendment. The Johnson Amendment was enacted by Senate, our U.S. Senate without a single bit of commentary or discussion on a voice vote only when then Lyndon Baines Johnson, then senator of Texas, came back from Texas after a bruising battle for reelection. He was angry at two businessmen who had two nonprofit corporations that opposed him because they thought he was soft on communism. So he added a couple of sentences to the IRS code which said in effect that anyone associated with a 501(c)(3), not‑for‑profit corporation could not oppose or speak out in any way pertaining to political issues or candidates’ positions, and the result is for 57 years this law has been not one single time tested in the court because the IRS doesn’t want it to be. And so the Alliance Defense Fund, a group of some 2,500 Christian attorneys allied together across America hand‑selected a group of 33 pastors in 2008 who would stand up and intentionally defy it and then record their sermons and send them to the IRS based upon the First Amendment’s freedom of speech and freedom of religion. Nothing happened. So the next year 84 pastors in 2009 did the same thing, recorded their sermons and sent them to the IRS; nothing happened. Last year 100 pastors did it. This year somewhere between 400 to 500 pastors have so far signed up and who will be sending in their sermons after they preach October the 2nd, and the whole issue of the Sunday is not whether or not a pastor outlines exactly where our candidate stands or how you should vote. The issue is there should be no government intrusion in the pulpit at all. The government should never tell a pastor how to preach in any way. If people actually believe in separation of church and state, they would affirm the fact that the government should have no capacity to dictate to any individual church or any pastor anywhere what they speak and so that’s the purpose of Pulpit Freedom Sunday. People can go to pulpitfreedom.com and there they will see a lot of information about this Sunday, and a tremendous movement is occurring across America.

Source: http://www.glennbeck.com/2011/09/26/pastors-speak-up-glenn-interviews-pastor-jim-garlow/?utm_source=glennbeck&utm_medium=contentcopy_link

 

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