Author Topic: NYT Fallout Shelter construction  (Read 301 times)

Offline Hoofer

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NYT Fallout Shelter construction
« on: May 26, 2017, 02:11:38 PM »
Not really much to get from this, the Swedish take, build it underground... very basic article.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/26/magazine/how-to-build-a-fallout-shelter.html?_r=0

Quote
“The most important thing is to build underground,” says Cédric Vuilleumier, an engineer for the Federal Office for Civil Protection in Switzerland, where all citizens are legally guaranteed a spot in a bomb shelter. Packed earth insulates against radiation and blast waves, but don’t go deeper than 10 feet; if your exits (make two) become blocked in the blast, you may need to dig yourself out.

Start with what Vuilleumier calls a “protective envelope” of concrete and reinforced steel rebar with walls between one foot and 2-feet-7-inches thick. Don’t build near anything flammable. Your budget may allow for more spaciousness, but plan for a minimum of nine square feet per person, which is what Switzerland provides. Install eight-inch-thick concrete and steel doors that open out. Add a ventilation and air-filtration system that can be operated with a hand crank in case of a power failure. (Swiss specifications for bomb-shelter parts are the gold standard internationally; many shelter-building companies in the United States and elsewhere import Swiss-made components.) 

Well, I guess if you live that close to RUSSIA and PUTIN.... add another foot or two of reinforced concrete.

Years ago, wifey and I looked at a 10 acre farm with a couple of outbuildings and a rather interesting house, half of which was a fully functional bomb shelter, buried of course.   After descending the stairs to the basement, which looked quite normal, it was hard not to notice you were standing among 3-4 rooms of thick cast concrete.   It extended out into the back yard, all underground.   Largest room was about 20x25, with other rooms attached to it, a storage room, bathroom and a second large room with mechanical equipment (probably with the idea of a kitchen, generator, whatever in mind).
There was a self closing, 2" thick steel door, and the rooms had 9 or 10' ceilings - nothing to give you a claustrophobic feeling at all, but once set up, it looked like it would be quite comfortable for an extended stay.  Extremely quiet too.

We loved the house, build on top of a gentle hill, by the roadway, but what really caught my eye was 2 attached & fully enclosed greenhouses - the kind with real glass panes, and a walkway connecting them.   A third greenhouse base, or concrete was also there, but no roof.  Of the two complete greenhouses, everything worked perfectly, though it looked like it was unused 4-5 years.  I remember turning a hand crank, and the window vent on the peak slowly opened and closed.

The place was last used for Tobacco research... and there was a rumor floating around, someone had buried hazardous waste on the property, just waiting to be discovered.   It also had 3 ponds, about 1 acre each, progressively stepping down the hill, with a little creek at the bottom.   Of course I was thinking micro-hydro down the hill, and a spiral pump to bring creek water up to the top pond. (when you need power, use the pond water, otherwise, it slowly gets filled from the spiral pump in the creek)

We passed on it.   Still wonder if anyone found some 55 gallon drums of poisonous sludge, or if a neighbor just wanted to get it cheap.   The house was pretty interesting though - well thought out, and very functional as a long term shelter.
All animals are created equal; Some just take longer to cook.   Survival is keeping an eye on those around you...

 

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