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Author Topic: Local food and medicine  (Read 640 times)

Offline Eyesabide

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Local food and medicine
« on: February 05, 2013, 10:56:16 AM »
 A working knowledge of local plants is a good tool to have no matter how well you are prepared or stocked with supplies. Do any of you regularly seek out wild foods and experiment with them?


Why do police cars almost always arrive in pairs? Because every officer knows that when seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

Offline JustKari

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2013, 11:42:54 AM »
I don't, but my husband does.  He is the go-to guy in our house for plant/mushroom identification.  I am the one studying what plants do what.  A bit off topic, but I am planting a medicinal garden next year, I really like Storeys guide to Basic Country skills as a guide.

Offline pisskop

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2013, 12:49:25 PM »
I am unfortunate enough to live in a small city, and being a full-time college student who also has to work (I refuse to take the government handouts) I don't have time to test things out extensively.  What I do have is a network of connections.

I volunteer my time at various organizations and chat up owners and suppliers.  I know where emergency food is and (WCS) how to get it.  I made a map of where to collect what I need and have a loose idea of where to go in case of certain scenerios.  I also know the fastest routes out of my city.

Knowledge is my tool, and about the only one I can afford.  And I have the experience of outdoor camping/gun ownership.  The survival training will hopefully come in time (and when I have time) but I do know how to 'streetfight' and at least how to scavange off the city.

No real stockpiles to speak of, excepting utility things. . .
[MANNERISM_THREAD:lurk]

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Offline Solar

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2013, 03:30:23 PM »
I am unfortunate enough to live in a small city, and being a full-time college student who also has to work (I refuse to take the government handouts) I don't have time to test things out extensively.  What I do have is a network of connections.

I volunteer my time at various organizations and chat up owners and suppliers.  I know where emergency food is and (WCS) how to get it.  I made a map of where to collect what I need and have a loose idea of where to go in case of certain scenerios.  I also know the fastest routes out of my city.

Knowledge is my tool, and about the only one I can afford.  And I have the experience of outdoor camping/gun ownership.  The survival training will hopefully come in time (and when I have time) but I do know how to 'streetfight' and at least how to scavange off the city.

No real stockpiles to speak of, excepting utility things. . .
I'd say you have a definite edge, and probably more prepared than 99% of city dwellers.


Even though I have land in the Sierra, I live to high for much variety of food.
About all we have here is what the Indians survived on, acorns, grub, plants for greens and game, lots of damn game, could have bagged a bear yesterday, walked right up behind me down by the creek.

If worst comes to worst, I'll take game, but I really hate venison.
Solar Right Wing Extremest

Offline pisskop

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2013, 07:46:54 AM »
Quote
I'd say you have a definite edge, and probably more prepared than 99% of city dwellers.

That's like saying to a midget "you're the tallest of the dwarves!"  :tounge:
[MANNERISM_THREAD:lurk]

Today's ??? (_07JUL13_):

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Offline Solar

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2013, 08:12:32 AM »
That's like saying to a midget "you're the tallest of the dwarves!"  :tounge:
:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
Or...
Smartest lib among liberals?  :rolleyes:
Not saying you are a lib of course, but you make a good point. :biggrin:
Solar Right Wing Extremest

Offline Solar

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2013, 03:07:00 PM »
So what are the foods in your local area that you can walk to in a day?
I have acorns, some greens by the creek, several medicinal plants, but really pretty limited unfortunately.
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Offline Eyesabide

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2013, 07:15:51 PM »
Solar, is there enough vegetation to have a bee hive or two out where you live?
Why do police cars almost always arrive in pairs? Because every officer knows that when seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

Offline Eyesabide

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2013, 07:27:19 PM »
I have a new assignment with work, I will be traveling back and forth across the country a few times in a six month period. Most places I will only be in for evenings and mornings, my days off mostly in a truck or van. I do plan to set some traps and identify and use some plants for cordage or food. The traps are no kill practice sets that do not injure or detain the animals. Some of the areas have really usefull rocks, and I plan to learn more about them as well.
Why do police cars almost always arrive in pairs? Because every officer knows that when seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

Online walkstall

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2013, 07:58:12 PM »
I have a new assignment with work, I will be traveling back and forth across the country a few times in a six month period. Most places I will only be in for evenings and mornings, my days off mostly in a truck or van. I do plan to set some traps and identify and use some plants for cordage or food. The traps are no kill practice sets that do not injure or detain the animals. Some of the areas have really usefull rocks, and I plan to learn more about them as well.

Sounds like a cool assignment Eye.  Don't forget your camera for pictures.
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Offline Cyborg

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2013, 08:59:27 PM »
Solar you say you hate venison!

Perhaps it's because your in the Sierra.
Here in Illinois a primary food for deer is Corn. My opinion the Venison is very tasty. 
However there are some caveats. Dress the deer immediately. Remove all the fat and tallow. Then if possible Age the meat for 4-7 days in a local meat locker if possible. 
Many people soak their steaks in salt water overnight.

However I think if your using a particular recipe to prepare your venison - look for a different recipe to see if it helps to enhance the meat.

Here are two  Videos. The first one should be owned by all survivalists in my opinion.


Deer from Field to Freezer $24.95

http://www.amazon.com/Deer-from-Field-to-Freezer/dp/B000EE05UW

Not intended to put professional butchers out of business, this DVD shows you one familys way of handling large animals, getting them ready for the frying pan using only a knife whilst yet in the field. John & Geri McPherson take a deer sized animal (here a goat) from moment of kill to ready to package for the freezer. As with all of their "How-To" instructional materials, they clearly illustrate step by step the way to take this animal apart using only a knife (they have used stone blades). John begins by removing the insides and then shows the proper way to skin leaving no holes or scores behind so that you retain a quality skin in the event that you decide to tan it (using their DVD Brain tan Buckskin as a guide). Geri then removes the sinew, head, tenderloins and loins. With the carcass, hanging from a tree limb Geri attacks it removing one quarter at a time, deboning and cutting the meat into steaks, roasts and stew meat. You will come away from this presentation understanding what is involved in taking your animal From Field to Freezer.

________________________________
Game Processing $19.95
http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/product.jsp?productId=746490

Field to the Freezer DVD

This DVD gives you professional, step-by-step advice on butchering your whitetail deer. You'll see six phases of game preparation in all, including skinning and front and rear quartering. No butchering detail is left out. Learn how pros cut choice boneless pieces of meat. Master Butcher Garry Zick provides clear and concise instructions. Zick is one of the country's most renowned butchers. You'll save a fortune on butchering costs. 140 min.




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Offline Elfie

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2013, 08:33:47 AM »
We have many plants,fruits and nuts around here... a good water supply to. I am not worried about having to go off the land....
Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere.
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Offline Solar

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Re: Local food and medicine
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2013, 09:19:00 AM »
Solar you say you hate venison!

Perhaps it's because your in the Sierra.
Here in Illinois a primary food for deer is Corn. My opinion the Venison is very tasty. 
However there are some caveats. Dress the deer immediately. Remove all the fat and tallow. Then if possible Age the meat for 4-7 days in a local meat locker if possible. 
Many people soak their steaks in salt water overnight.

However I think if your using a particular recipe to prepare your venison - look for a different recipe to see if it helps to enhance the meat.

Here are two  Videos. The first one should be owned by all survivalists in my opinion.


Deer from Field to Freezer $24.95

http://www.amazon.com/Deer-from-Field-to-Freezer/dp/B000EE05UW

Not intended to put professional butchers out of business, this DVD shows you one familys way of handling large animals, getting them ready for the frying pan using only a knife whilst yet in the field. John & Geri McPherson take a deer sized animal (here a goat) from moment of kill to ready to package for the freezer. As with all of their "How-To" instructional materials, they clearly illustrate step by step the way to take this animal apart using only a knife (they have used stone blades). John begins by removing the insides and then shows the proper way to skin leaving no holes or scores behind so that you retain a quality skin in the event that you decide to tan it (using their DVD Brain tan Buckskin as a guide). Geri then removes the sinew, head, tenderloins and loins. With the carcass, hanging from a tree limb Geri attacks it removing one quarter at a time, deboning and cutting the meat into steaks, roasts and stew meat. You will come away from this presentation understanding what is involved in taking your animal From Field to Freezer.

________________________________
Game Processing $19.95
http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/product.jsp?productId=746490

Field to the Freezer DVD

This DVD gives you professional, step-by-step advice on butchering your whitetail deer. You'll see six phases of game preparation in all, including skinning and front and rear quartering. No butchering detail is left out. Learn how pros cut choice boneless pieces of meat. Master Butcher Garry Zick provides clear and concise instructions. Zick is one of the country's most renowned butchers. You'll save a fortune on butchering costs. 140 min.

That's a very small possibility, but the main reason is adrenaline, unless it's an instant kill, adrenaline taints the meat, and deer can be a pain, as soon as they sense anything, they tense up and adrenaline starts flowing.

Like I say, if I were really hungry I'd eat it, but I still don't care for the flavor unless it's all jerked in a smoker, which is what I would do if I took one.
Solar Right Wing Extremest

 

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