Author Topic: Got Good Tread on an Old Tire? New Research Says NO!  (Read 1821 times)

Offline Solar

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Got Good Tread on an Old Tire? New Research Says NO!
« on: June 04, 2018, 04:48:19 PM »
I have no doubt there's a lot of us old farts that didn't know this stuff since it's only been an issue this century. :lol:

I'm getting my tires rotated and discovered they are already at end of life with only 12,000 miles on them, but they are truck tires on a diesel 1 1/2-ton 4x4, so they don't have a lot of tread wear left anyway, so it would be time to replace regardless.
But this came up because now that the wife is retired,  and even though she has plenty of tread life left, the tires only have a couple years before they need replacing.
The good news is, now we only have to buy snow tires, and not two different tires for seasonal change out. :laugh:

If it's older than 6 to 8 years, it could cost you far more than a new set of tires when they do fail.
This is especially important for RV's and trailers, since they get little use.
Here's the thing, processes have changed, that old WWII bias ply tire sitting on that old Jeep may be fine for its purpose, but they had an entirely different process when it was made.
Todays tires use a different vulcanization process, different adhesives, as well as different chemicals used to keep rubber elastic, however, these new compounds also breakdown from oxidation much, much faster.

Here's a couple of pages worth looking at to help determine the age of your tire as well as provide additional information.



Scroll down for a clickable gif explaining what the numbers mean on your tires

https://www.nhtsa.gov/equipment/tires

Great info here and images.



https://www.ntsb.gov/news/events/Documents/2014_Tire_Safety_SYM_Panel_4b_Kane.pdf

« Last Edit: June 04, 2018, 04:52:54 PM by Solar »
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Offline Solar

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Re: Got Good Tread on an Old Tire? New Research Says NO!
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2018, 09:25:24 AM »
Even though no one has commented, it's good to see people are reading this information.   :thumbup:
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Offline Hoofer

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Re: Got Good Tread on an Old Tire? New Research Says NO!
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2018, 10:28:08 AM »
the nut of it:

The Aging of Tires -Influence on the Damage Frequency
     F. Nowakowski; DEKRA Industry Publication; 1986

•  Correlated tire age to tire failures
•  Examined 146 tread separation failures
•  Dramatic increase in failures after 6 years
•  Concludes: remove tires older than 6 years regardless of tread depth Safety
All animals are created equal; Some just take longer to cook.   Survival is keeping an eye on those around you...

Offline Solar

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Re: Got Good Tread on an Old Tire? New Research Says NO!
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2018, 10:49:15 AM »
the nut of it:

The Aging of Tires -Influence on the Damage Frequency
     F. Nowakowski; DEKRA Industry Publication; 1986

•  Correlated tire age to tire failures
•  Examined 146 tread separation failures
•  Dramatic increase in failures after 6 years
•  Concludes: remove tires older than 6 years regardless of tread depth Safety
Yep, it's one of two reasons you see so many RV/boat trailers on the side of the road, old tires that look great and dry wheel bearings, but tires on trailers tend to check in the sun and crack.
I have a trailer I bought ten years ago, probably has 200 miles total use, tires look brand new, but I'd be willing to bet, a freeway drive consisting of 100 miles would wind up with tread separation and a blowout.
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