Author Topic: 1st hand report from Thailand.  (Read 2698 times)

Offline Eyesabide

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1st hand report from Thailand.
« on: May 18, 2011, 01:46:06 PM »
 
 
      Hey folks! I am working in Europe, waiting to be rotated back to the states. my replacement just came in from Bangcock. Shortly after the tsunami in Japan, Thailand was hit with extended torrential rains that flooded the small island where my co-worker lives. He lives in a community of about one thousand people, semi rural with a resort nearby. When the flood waters got shin deep on his block, his nieghbor told him not to worry, "it never gets past my porch", which was about knee high to my friend. At waist high, people were moving their belongings up to the second floor, and at neck deep ( which was about an hour after it hit his shin,) to my 5'10 friend, people were still in good spirits. My friend had his own room on the third floor, and the first few days after the flood subsided, he opened his room to the people who were living in the hall. He kept his food in a locked cabinet, and people respected that, but he also had a few hidden stashes of peanut butter and canned tuna if things got really bad.
 
      He had to find food, there were Seven Eleven convenience stores that would let a couple people in at a time, but the stores had been flooded, most of the goods were covered in mud and oil, and many canned goods had the labels destroyed. The stores did not hike prices. The waters were dangerous, fishing was not disallowed, but very difficult because of the unstable shores, and fast water. Few if any people were fishing. The people did not riot, but there was some casual looting.
 
      In the community of 1000, about a dozen people died from electrocution, and an infant died by drowning in the quickly rising water as its mother was scrambling to bring goods and neccessities upstairs
Tourists in the hotels did better, but all of the roads were closed and flooded, and there was no electricity for six days. A few other people died by drowning.
 
The rain lasted a couple of days, when it stopped, the flooding did too.
 
   The elecricity was out for five to six days, and that was about the limit for people to not start getting agressive with each other. During the flood, my friend was told to eat at the restaurants before he started to eat his own food. the restaurants did cook what they could, and after the second day, were open only in the evenings, serving rice and meat soup kitchen style.
 
At the end of the week, people were getting angry because the "superstore", similar to Wal-Mart, was not open and there was talk of raiding it. What the people did not know was the store was hit badly, and everything was being removed by bulldozers inside the store. Whatever canned and sealed goods they could recover were put in shopping carts, rinsed and sold a week later, after the flood. I assume at a discount. What stopped the raid was the electricity was turned back on.
 
The most valued commodity? Fresh eggs. Many people had their own chickens, and eggs were golden.
 
 
     
 
 
Muskets High!

Online Solar

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2011, 02:44:45 PM »
Interesting, in a culture where just 40 short years ago, was 3rd World status, you would think they could deal better.
But even a culture that you would think could deal with the issue, five days seems to be a breaking point universally.
 
This is a good lesson for all of us, and thanks for the tip on eggs, having chickens could be a God send when things go wrong.

Its hard for us to put ourselves in their position, but it gives one food for thought.
Thanks for posting.
#WWG1WGA

Offline Eyesabide

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2011, 11:29:26 PM »
From the conversation, I learned a few things to think about. utilizing a place like a restaurant if available in a disaster before hitting personal reserves has some advantages, such as it puts you in touch with the community to network and find out what actually is going on.
 
knowing a communities general breaking point is five days can also be put to use. Holding out for a week or more before using your generator can be a defense against people who would normally have used their reserves and move on instead of staying to take yours when they think things are really bad.
Muskets High!

Offline Possumpoint

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2011, 04:25:59 AM »
From the conversation, I learned a few things to think about. utilizing a place like a restaurant if available in a disaster before hitting personal reserves has some advantages, such as it puts you in touch with the community to network and find out what actually is going on.
 
knowing a communities general breaking point is five days can also be put to use. Holding out for a week or more before using your generator can be a defense against people who would normally have used their reserves and move on instead of staying to take yours when they think things are really bad.
If you hold out on using your generator for a week or more how will you keep your refrigerated and frozen foods?

Offline Eyesabide

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2011, 12:38:14 PM »
Good point, and every case is different. Other than cars and motorcycles being washed to the sea, In this area of Thailand, it is common for people to keep a refrigerator on their back porch. Many were washed away.  I did not ask if generators were common, but my co-worker did mention the restaurants without electricity used the foods that needed refrigeration first.  This is a poor area where people do not have a lot of cold foods stored for more than a day or two anyway. They just go to the little shop down the street and pick up What they need daily.
Muskets High!

Offline quiller

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2011, 01:31:47 PM »
Great reportage, Eyes. Thanks.

Offline Solars Toy

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2011, 07:19:32 PM »
Thanks Eyes....  Just another reminder of how good we have it in the US and how so many take it for granted.  :)
“It’s comes down to a simple choice really, get busy living or get busy dying.”

Online Solar

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2011, 10:37:57 AM »
Thanks Eyes....  Just another reminder of how good we have it in the US and how so many take it for granted.  :)
I fear it won't be long before we will be suffering from hyperinflation, and living with only a couple days of food at a time.
We need to be stocking up...
#WWG1WGA

Offline WoodBurner

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2011, 03:31:27 PM »
I fear it won't be long before we will be suffering from hyperinflation, and living with only a couple days of food at a time.
We need to be stocking up...
Beans and Bullets Solar........
 
Beans and Bullets...........
If it was easy everyone would be do'in it.

Online Solar

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2011, 04:08:39 PM »
Beans and Bullets Solar........
 
Beans and Bullets...........
LOL, we've been stocking up on both. 8)
#WWG1WGA

Online walkstall

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Re: 1st hand report from Thailand.
« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2011, 08:55:23 PM »
Beans and Bullets Solar........
 
Beans and Bullets...........

along with corn bread.  ;D
A politician thinks of the next election. A statesman, of the next generation.- James Freeman Clarke

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