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Author Topic: Cars/Racing  (Read 1178 times)

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Cars/Racing
« on: February 22, 2020, 02:06:28 PM »
Didn't see another area for this topic. If not appropriate, it can be moved.

I'm little bias toward the 69 Camaro but I love all the muscle cars of cruising the boulevard era. That was a major social activity during my teenage years. These days kids text while they drive, way more dangerous than what we had. We would already have our cars loaded with friends, one of the benefits of cruising the boulevard. Every town had one, those were the days. Good times!

    Why is America Obsessed With the 1969 Camaro?
      While the 1969 Camaro isn’t mechanically much different from the 1967 and 1968 editions, new sheetmetal left the car looking more voluptuous and aggressive. It was, and to many remains, the best looking Camaro ever. That’s why both the 2010 fifth-generation—and the new sixth-gen—Camaros have been explicitly styled to resemble it.

      The sheer number of different ’69 Camaro variations is staggering. The Z/28, built to dominate SCCA road racing was back in ’69 and still powered by the nervy, 290-horsepower DZ302 5.0-liter V-8. It took the Trans Am manufacturer’s championship for the second straight year. To go drag racing, Chevrolet sold ZL-1 models powered by an incredible, all-aluminum 427-ci (7-liter) big-block V-8, ludicrously underrated at 430 hp. Meanwhile, in Pennsylvania, dealer Don Yenko ordered 201 Camaros powered by iron-block 427s to create his own Yenko Super Cars. There were RS and SS versions, and examples that combined the two. If you loved convertibles, there was an Indy 500 pace car replica Camaros with orange stripes, orange houndstooth upholstery and the totally radical “Cowl Induction” hood, otherwise offered only on the Z/28. For restoration freaks, there are a lot of different ’69 Camaros to keep the anal-retentive brain cells occupied.

      But leaving the ’69 Camaro in pristine, factory-sealed condition is boring. Those with a supercharged engine bursting through the hood are as purely American as any Ferrari is Italian, or Porsche is German. Jacked up on a set of crapped-out leaf springs by a demented gas station jockey, or refined into a world-beating supercar by a legendary builder like GM engineer Mark Stielow, the mechanically simple ’69 Camaro remains great looking and relatively reliable. Given the ease with which its mechanical bits can be mutated, the sheer production and its resilient beauty, it’s no wonder the ’69 Camaro has been the car this generation has loved. But no generation lasts. Today ’69 Camaros have become stupidly valuable as their numbers have dwindled, and the Hot Wheels age cohort has hit its peak earning years. Youngsters living on a budget need not apply. But, like the generations who loved the ’32 Ford and ’55-’57 Chevy before it, those of us who loved this Camaro are aging beyond it.

      In 20 years, we’re not going to have to the energy to sustain its massive popularity. The ’69 Camaro isn’t going away, but the kids born in the eighties, nineties and beyond won’t have the same balls-out passion for it either. I don’t know what’s next, but there’s always a next.
        Right now, however, 50 years after it first appeared. The ’69 Camaro is the most loved car in America.
          http://www.thedrive.com/muscle-cars/1010/ask-the-drive-why-is-america-obsessed-with-the-1969-camaro


            More to come....
            "Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

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            Re: Cars/Racing
            « Reply #1 on: February 22, 2020, 06:00:24 PM »
            Bad to the bone. Some deemed the LS6 Chevelle king of the muscle cars.



            There's been rumors of Chevy bringing the Chevelle back.

            Oh, Mustangs & Challengers are cool too. Ford never stopped producing it's iconic car. Dodge did an excellent job of recreating the Challenger with loads of variations to choose from.

            There's just something about a LS6 Chevelle that just screams Grrrrrr!
            "Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

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            Re: Cars/Racing
            « Reply #2 on: February 24, 2020, 04:32:50 PM »
            The boss of the pony car that started it all.

              The Boss of Bosses – 1969 Mustang Boss 429 -  As with all muscle cars, the heart of the Boss 429 was the engine. Everything about the 429 was huge. The intake ports and large-diameter valves were large enough to keep these engines spinning up to 8,000 rpm. The intakes measured 2.28 inches and the exhaust valves were 1.90 inches in diameter. The mammoth hemispherical cylinder heads and rocker covers were aluminum (early versions were magnesium). The crankshaft was a forged-steel unit, which was statically and dynamically balanced. This engine was rated at 375 horsepower but that number was not even close to its potential.
                  Ford used a Holley 735cfm carburetor mounted on an aluminum intake manifold. Engineers designed the cylinder heads without gaskets. Ford called this the “dry-deck” method. Instead, an individual rubber O-ring was used for each of the 21 oil and water passages inside each cylinder head. Another four stainless steel O-rings sealed the combustion chamber. A forged steel crankshaft spun in a four-bolt main bearing block. Despite the performance potential of these rare engines, Ford had to install the Thermactor pollution-control system. Other than “Boss 429” decals on the front fenders and a huge, manually controlled air scoop that sealed to the top of the air cleaner, there were no other emblems to show this was a special car. The 1969 cars, like our feature car, had dual front pipes leading to two “bullet” type resonators, that led to a single transverse muffler and into two turn-down tips.  The battery was trunk mounted to improve weight distribution. Unlike the 1970 Boss 429s, the ’69 version does not have a rev limiter.
                      https://www.hemmings.com/blog/article/the-boss-of-bosses-1969-mustang-boss-429/
                      « Last Edit: February 24, 2020, 04:36:17 PM by 1 CAT FAN »
                      "Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

                      Offline Solar

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                      Re: Cars/Racing
                      « Reply #3 on: February 24, 2020, 05:23:17 PM »
                      I've got a 70 El Camino for sale, no drive train, original owner, needs a lot of work.
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                      Re: Cars/Racing
                      « Reply #4 on: February 25, 2020, 07:02:43 AM »
                      It would look good restored, folks.



                      When is a truck not just a truck and a muscle car much more than a muscle car? When they’re an El Camino, of course. Chevrolet’s third-generation “personal truck” mirrored the A-body Chevelle upon which it was based and shared engines and equipment, and when fitted with ultra high-performance SS454 equipment, the 1970-1972 El Camino could run rings around many conventional muscle cars while retaining a semblance of truck utility. Like Chevelles, El Caminos are blessed with an amazing availability of restoration and performance parts, and they appeal to folks who love big-block power, who need utility beyond what a coupe or convertible can offer, who appreciate the El Camino’s “neither here nor there” style, and who don’t like to see their doppelgängers at every stoplight. The Chevrolet El Camino SS454 truly inspires bowtie pride while hauling from both ends.

                      The 1970 restyle brought quad headlamps set in a body-colored surround panel, which framed a bold horizontal grille split by a body-colored bar. Circular parking lamp/turn signals were mounted in the front bumpers, and SS grille and fender badges and a standard domed or optional cowl-induction hood were part of the Super Sport package. The $2,850 V-8-powered El Camino Custom was the basis for RPO Z15/LS5 and RPO Z15/LS6, which translated to the new SS454 and eclipsed the previous top-performing SS396. This $503.45 Z15/LS5 package brought a 360hp 454-cu.in. V-8, chrome engine accents, dual exhausts, power front disc brakes, a black painted grille, chrome wheel-arch moldings and 14 x 7-inch styled steel wheels. Adding the $263.30 Z15/LS6 package netted the famed 450hp LS6 V-8, making the 1970 El Camino the hands-down fastest truck on the planet. The aforementioned cowl-induction hood was part of the $147.45 ZL2 package, which included a sport-striped, pin-secured hood with a vacuum-operated flap that ducted low-pressure cold air to the carburetor when the accelerator was floored.
                      https://www.hemmings.com/blog/article/chevrolet-el-camino-ss454-1970-72/

                      "Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

                      Offline Possum

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                      Re: Cars/Racing
                      « Reply #5 on: February 25, 2020, 01:50:17 PM »
                      I've got a 70 El Camino for sale, no drive train, original owner, needs a lot of work.
                      My best friend and best man at my wedding had one. We spent hours in either that or my 70 chevelle . I seem to remember it came with a lot of hangovers.  :lol: but what a great vehicle. 

                      Offline Solar

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                      Re: Cars/Racing
                      « Reply #6 on: February 25, 2020, 02:45:06 PM »
                      My best friend and best man at my wedding had one. We spent hours in either that or my 70 chevelle . I seem to remember it came with a lot of hangovers.  :lol: but what a great vehicle.
                      I've restored it twice, but now? Too old to get excited over, but I must admit, I really miss the smooth and quiet ride it has.

                      I just want to see someone else restore it, which is why I won't part it out. I cold make 10 times what I'm asking if I were to part it out, but she's an old friend, we've been through a lot together, lots of girlfriends and break ups, hang overs/unders, sleeping in the back on long trips across the country.
                      Yeah, good times, great cars... :thumbup:
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                      Re: Cars/Racing
                      « Reply #7 on: February 26, 2020, 07:25:34 AM »
                      This was my baby, until I lost it in a restoration fire. The facility it was being restored in caught fire, the car had been taken apart and they couldn't get it out before the Fire Dept. arrived. I know it's just a car, but it felt like a family member had past away. Can't afford to replace it, the value of these cars have sky rocketed. I only gave $8500 when I bought it, three days later the engine blew. Had a family member who has a mechanic shop that rebuilt the engine for $2000. These days just finding a solid shell for over $10,000 is difficult. The old phrase " You don't know what you've got till it's gone."





                      "Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

                      Offline Solar

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                      Re: Cars/Racing
                      « Reply #8 on: February 26, 2020, 07:56:20 AM »
                      This was my baby, until I lost it in a restoration fire. The facility it was being restored in caught fire, the car had been taken apart and they couldn't get it out before the Fire Dept. arrived. I know it's just a car, but it felt like a family member had past away. Can't afford to replace it, the value of these cars have sky rocketed. I only gave $8500 when I bought it, three days later the engine blew. Had a family member who has a mechanic shop that rebuilt the engine for $2000. These days just finding a solid shell for over $10,000 is difficult. The old phrase " You don't know what you've got till it's gone."


                      True story.
                      A friend I grew up with had one exactly like it, same color and everything. We'd all go out partying in it, what have you. Then one day we were driving along, Jerry's 8 track was jammed, radio didn't work, so it was just us yackin and he hit the brakes because a bag blew in front of us.
                      He stopped, the car rocked and made a sloshing sound. I said what was that? He said his rear window leaked and the water filled the trunk. (Jerry was a lazy sort, never did anything unless he was forced to)

                      So I said shouldn't you drain it? He said it's Spring, it always dries up. :lol:
                      Anyway, about a month later we get pulled over because Jerry was also a lousy driver and failed to signal, let alone see very well, so the cop pulled him over.
                      Typical approach, license, registration, insurance wasn't mandatory back then. The cop seemed like an upright gut, asked if we were high, and we weren't oddly enough. So he asks Jerry why his car was dripping water.

                      Jerry said: "I thought it all dried up"? Cop laughs and asked what he needed it for, growing weed? We thought it was an odd comment, and laughed a bit, then he said, no, seriously, I could bust you for growing weed, it's a felony.
                      We looked at each other with a blank stare, had no idea what he was talking about. He said get out, I want to show you something. Tells Jerry to look in the back. Jerry apologizes for the mess, about a years worth of fast food wrappers on the floor soaking wet.
                      Cop says look close! On the floor board there was about 50 weed plants sprouting in the paper fertilizer. All the cheap Mexican weed with seed had germinated in the car. Jerry was shocked, and his eyesight not being worth a shit, challenged the cop. Cop not happy about being challenged threatened to haul his ass to jail, so I intervened and said let me look. Yep, Jerry, the officer is right, that's weed growing.
                      I told the cop it wasn't ours, that Jerry had loaned his car out...Cop looks at me and laughs out loud, knowing that was total BS.

                      He said get that shit out of there and drain that damn trunk, you aren't the first Camero owner with a leaky back window, mine leaks too. Cop grins big, we all laughed and he says, now get out of here, next time I see you, I'll do a real search.
                      Jerry was forced to clean out his car, drain the trunk and seal the glass, which was damned near impossible due to years of rust.

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                      Offline American Exceptionalism

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                      Re: Cars/Racing
                      « Reply #9 on: February 26, 2020, 08:07:51 AM »

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                      Re: Cars/Racing
                      « Reply #10 on: March 02, 2020, 11:49:41 AM »
                      Some street racers weren’t attention seekers. They got their kicks by humbling flashy, high-buck muscle cars, shutting them down in an ambush of speed and stealth. The 1969 Chevrolet Nova SS 396 seemed ideal for such duty. But looks can be deceiving.
                          Chevy had redesigned its compact for ’68, but the look was still pretty tame. The chassis design, however, was shared with the Camaro, so big blocks finally fit. Sure enough, the 396-cid V-8 appeared as a Super Sport option partway through ’68. For ’69, the 396 was back in 350-bhp tune and -- for those who knew how to play the order form -- as the 375-bhp L78.
                              SS badges, black-accented grille and tail, and simulated hood air intakes marked the exterior, but nothing shouted supercar. Still, all stealthiness seemed to dissolve with the L78. What the “396” numerals on the fender suggested, the racket of solid lifters and the ominous rumble from dual exhausts confirmed. An SS Nova was no sleeper in 375-bhp L78 form. The clatter of solid lifters and the rumble from its dual exhausts attracted too many eyes to those “396″ badges.

                              “The junior Chevy with the senior engine... is an instantly recognized and feared street cleaner,” reported Car and Driver. “The 396 Chevy II sure wasn’t the invisible sleeper we had expected, but it was every bit as wild as we hoped.”
                                The 300-hp L48 350 engine received a chrome air-cleaner lid. Power disc brakes were part of the SS option, but power steering (not shown) was optional.


                                  https://www.hemmings.com/blog/article/1969-chevrolet-nova-ss/

                                  71' Nova, my first car in high school.

                                  "Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

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                                  Re: Cars/Racing
                                  « Reply #11 on: March 16, 2020, 09:58:35 AM »
                                    The Hemi has been a legend for many years, but that triple-carbed 440 engine had adopted a cult following of its own. A significant body change had been planned for the ’70 model, but that would be put off until the 1971 model year.
                                     
                                    The 1970 440 continued to be capable of 390 horsepower when equipped with the so-called Air Grabber induction system. That interesting system provided a solid connection between the hood scoops and engine once the hood was closed. The sides of the pop-up Air Grabber door were eye-catching with evil-looking shark’s teeth etched on the sides.
                                        The front end was menacing-looking with the blackout grille containing twin headlights mounted in its ends. The agressive bumper contained a pair of round parking lights on either side of the license plate. When looking at the ’70 Road Runner, and comparing it with the other garnish MOPAR muscle machines of the era, it appeared downright stripped. Oh, there was a stripe and 440+6 lettering on the hood, but that was about it. About the only eye catcher was the simulated rear-fender-scoop cut-out.
                                         
                                        Some of the models did, however, have a dust trail that reached from near the front of the front fender and disappeared into that scoop.
                                            The only sizable name identification externally was the “Road Runner” lettering contained in a stripe located on the rear end of the car, just above the tail lights. As far as engine identification, in addition to the aforementioned 440+6 designations on the hood, there was also a “440″ in the rear of a hood bulge with turn signal indicators.
                                                With that famous name, the company made the most of it with a special horn to sound like that famous cartoon bird. The horn made the Road Runner ’Beep Beep’ sound which was unmistakable.
                                                  https://www.topspeed.com/cars/car-news/a-killer-70-road-runner-muscle-car-ar46303.html
                                                  "Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

                                                  Offline 1 CAT FAN

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                                                  Re: Cars/Racing
                                                  « Reply #12 on: March 25, 2020, 04:03:51 PM »
                                                  Bought this beast a few days ago. Couple had it tucked away in a garage with their 69' Z/28 & 67' Camaro convertible SS.


                                                   
                                                  Got it tucked away in my garage.

                                                  « Last Edit: March 25, 2020, 04:07:17 PM by 1 CAT FAN »
                                                  "Only God can do this and I give him all the glory. I know where my strength comes from and I know it's simply by his grace that I've been able to walk this walk and walk this journey." - Dabo Swinney

                                                   

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