Author Topic: Question about a gas stove.  (Read 1101 times)

Offline The Boo Man...

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Question about a gas stove.
« on: February 20, 2013, 07:35:39 PM »
I am about to put down new flooring in the kitchen. I have to pull out the stove. What do I have to do since it is gas? I assume I can't just disconnect the pipe.




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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2013, 07:52:41 PM »
There should be a small shut off valve on the line leading to the stove, usually at the beginning of the flex tubing connected to the stove.
If not there, follow the gas line back to the main connection, you may find one there, if not, you will have to shut off the main valve and it better have one, if not, install one after the gas company shuts it off for you.

Once you have the new stove installed, turn the gas back on and let it bleed a moment so as to get the air out of the line, then tighten it down.
You may want to tape the pipe off after you disconnect the stove to hold the gas from seeping out and becoming a risk and it also makes it easier to bleed the line later.

Be sure and add some dish washing liquid to a spray bottle, about a table spoon to 16 ounces of water, then spray your connections to check for leaks after turning on the gas, if you see foam, tighten your connections till it stops. (you should see no bubbles at all)
Be sure and use Teflon tape and a good joint seal, the hardware store will sell you a small tube of Teflon based putty.

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Offline walkstall

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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2013, 08:12:00 PM »
Be sure it Teflon tape is for gas lines not water line Teflon tape.    The difference is gas tape is much thicker.

http://sealtape.com/ptfe_yellow.html
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Online TboneAgain

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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2013, 11:28:05 PM »
Yeah, Walkstall's link is a little slow, but the point is to make sure you use the correct thread sealant. I've always preferred the "gunk in a can" stuff for gas pipes, but there is a Teflon-based tape sealant these days. The gas variety is different from the water stuff, and it is sold on YELLOW reels in the U.S., as opposed to the BLUE reels for water tape.
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Offline The Stranger

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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2013, 06:36:15 AM »
You shouldn't use teflon tape on a flare fitting it will/may not seal correctly. The flare doesn't seal at the threads but at the flair and you don't want nothing to stop or get in the way of the connection such as a clump of tape.
Quote
They are designed to seal without tape or dope, and may actually leak if tape or dope is used.
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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2013, 07:18:30 AM »
You shouldn't use teflon tape on a flare fitting it will/may not seal correctly. The flare doesn't seal at the threads but at the flair and you don't want nothing to stop or get in the way of the connection such as a clump of tape.
-
Good point, that's why I only use a little Teflon based pipe dope.
Gas connections are far different than those of water lines.
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Offline The Stranger

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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2013, 07:23:40 AM »
-
Good point, that's why I only use a little Teflon based pipe dope.
Gas connections are far different than those of water lines.
:thumbup:
Here also, should have mentioned that. The dope isn't to seal but to allow that little extra turn from the brass on brass that sometimes get sticky.

My background,
Started out as a refrigeration mechanic, then added HVAC and plumbing. Did some minor electrical work with a friend who was licensed. Had my own Mechanical Contracting business for more then a decade until Illness and Divorce did that in. There was nothing we didn't do, if we couldn't do it we knew who could, secret to our success, never say we can't but we always can.
Then was a Director of Maintenance for a Group of 17 or so Nursing/Rehab homes.
Then illness did me in again. But still putter around and try to keep up with latest technologies for the home. :blink:
 
« Last Edit: June 08, 2013, 07:30:47 AM by The Stranger »
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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2013, 07:51:38 AM »
:thumbup:
Here also, should have mentioned that. The dope isn't to seal but to allow that little extra turn from the brass on brass that sometimes get sticky.

My background,
Started out as a refrigeration mechanic, then added HVAC and plumbing. Did some minor electrical work with a friend who was licensed. Had my own Mechanical Contracting business for more then a decade until Illness and Divorce did that in. There was nothing we didn't do, if we couldn't do it we knew who could, secret to our success, never say we can't but we always can.
Then was a Director of Maintenance for a Group of 17 or so Nursing/Rehab homes.
Then illness did me in again. But still putter around and try to keep up with latest technologies for the home. :blink:
Like you, I too putter, or more lately, mutter about the things I used to putter with. :biggrin:

About 35 to 40 years ago, I did gas installation in residential, as well as propane tank install for homes and business.
One thing I know and I know you know, but gets neglected in these hints and tips threads, is never mix metals, especially gas if avoidable, it creates electrolysis.
Basically it is a battery and battery's slowly degrade over time by giving up electrons via ion degradation, in the same way lead decomposes in a battery if not recharged.
One of the opposing metals will fatigue and fail leaving a serious gas leak hazard.

One of the worst mixes is galvanized pipe to brass fittings.
Koolaid is for kids, TEA is for adults

Online TboneAgain

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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2013, 05:58:45 PM »
Like you, I too putter, or more lately, mutter about the things I used to putter with. :biggrin:

About 35 to 40 years ago, I did gas installation in residential, as well as propane tank install for homes and business.
One thing I know and I know you know, but gets neglected in these hints and tips threads, is never mix metals, especially gas if avoidable, it creates electrolysis.
Basically it is a battery and battery's slowly degrade over time by giving up electrons via ion degradation, in the same way lead decomposes in a battery if not recharged.
One of the opposing metals will fatigue and fail leaving a serious gas leak hazard.

One of the worst mixes is galvanized pipe to brass fittings.

Natch. In my part of the world (Ohio) code generally dictates that things like connections between copper (or brass, which is a zinc/copper alloy) water plumbing and the (usually) galvanized iron inlets on a hot-water tank have to be electrically insulated with specially-made connectors. This problem has REALLY faded in recent years due to the widespread application of plastic plumbing.

Paradoxically, it's more a problem now in cities, where electrical codes tend to be stricter and more strictly enforced, to provide adequate earth grounding for a residential electrical service. It's been maybe ten years since I installed a new 200-amp service in a house, but at that time, the electric company required grounding of the service to BOTH the buried copper water supply AND an eight-foot copper-clad ground rod driven flush to grade. I'm hearing these days that in many locations, TWO of those 8-footers are now required because municipal water systems are going plastic as fast as they can, and the option of clamping a ground cable to the incoming water pipe is no longer available.

Many is the corroded brass/copper/iron mess I've fixed where folks connected grounded plumbing to a hot water tank.
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people. -- Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution

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Offline The Stranger

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Re: Question about a gas stove.
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2013, 04:46:55 AM »
Yes here in WNC two grounds are required. Although when I did my barn only had one in at the time and the insp. never noticed, I did put it in anyway as required. Who wants the hassle if something happens because of a lousy ground rod.
Never understood who wanted the hassles of cutting corners to save a few bucks?
I still love to work but it now takes me days it seems to do things that used to take hours.  :blush:
“Every man is like the company he keeps.”
"Show me your friends and I'll show you your Future"

 

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