Author Topic: IP Question  (Read 6804 times)

Offline admin

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Re: IP Question
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2011, 04:10:29 PM »

Not a bad looking lady either...

Funny, she looks nothing like she sounds. ::) :D

Offline Goose

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Re: IP Question
« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2011, 08:32:52 PM »
If you run a laptop wirelessly from your home PC will it have the same IP address as the PC?
 
Does this same laptop's IP addy change every time you log out and shut down?
 
 
My friend's husband keeps hacking into her Facebook account and she doesn't know how ... so if she gets a laptop for her personal use will he still be able to access the FB account from the PC if she never goes on the PC again and changes the password of her FB?

No more than one IP address can exist on a given network.  Your wireless router at home takes your incoming traffic, sent to the IP address that your provider assigns to your account, and then sends it over to your private network, usually 192.168.0.xxx, unless you change it.  If more than one device has the same IP address on a network you will get IP conflicts like crazy.  It would be like having twins and giving them the same name and trying to call only one of them to take out the trash.

The IP address that your wireless router assign are normally DHCP (Dynamic Host Control Protocol).  This is the default setting and not a very secure method of running your network. In essence anyone with a wireless card can authenticate to your network.  For security you should at a minimum not broadcast the SSID and require a WEP key to get on.

If you really want to secure you network, you should use static IP address.  This means that only the address that you assign will be allowed on the network.  It takes a little set up and you will need to have one or two addresses for guest use but this really locks it down.  My network is also locked to the MAC address of the equipment I want to allow on.  The MAC address is the name that is given to all ethernet devices then they are made and in theory cannot be changed and no two in the world are the same.

However I think that if your friends facebook account is getting hacked by her husband and this pisses her off, then they have a issues of a different type to contend with that no amount of networking knowledge will fix.  You don't have to be on the same network to hack someones password.  He may have installed a key stroke capture system on her laptop or something similar, or she uses really bad passwords that are easy for him to guess.
I have never seen a wild thing feel sorry for itself. A little bird will fall dead, frozen from a bough, without ever having felt sorry for itself.--D.H. Lawrence

Offline Goose

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Re: IP Question
« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2011, 08:36:43 PM »
If you run a laptop wirelessly from your home PC will it have the same IP address as the PC?
 
Does this same laptop's IP addy change every time you log out and shut down?
 
 
My friend's husband keeps hacking into her Facebook account and she doesn't know how ... so if she gets a laptop for her personal use will he still be able to access the FB account from the PC if she never goes on the PC again and changes the password of her FB?

One other thing I forgot to mention.  When your router assigns an IP address on initial authentication, that IP address is considered "leased" and the lease does expire.  How long that takes is again up to the settings.  It is possible that every time you authenticate to the network the IP addy changes, however most leases are longer than that and unless a particular IP address is reassigned to another device, even if the lease has expired the router will assign the same IP address to a particular device time after time based on the MAC address.

All of these things can be set up different than the default settings but beware, messing with IP addresses can get frustrating because on fat fingered number will result in a long list of headaches.  You also need to be diligent about keeping a record of what IP address are assigned to what devices if you decide to use a fixed IP scheme.
I have never seen a wild thing feel sorry for itself. A little bird will fall dead, frozen from a bough, without ever having felt sorry for itself.--D.H. Lawrence

Offline Cyborg

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Re: IP Question
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2011, 01:45:58 AM »
Step by Step, Secure your wireless network.

http://www.komando.com/tips/index.aspx?id=1629&page=1


Wireless is a great choice for a home network. Physically awkward or nearly impossible connections between computers become easy through a wireless network. But wireless comes with its own brand of security worries.

Wireless computers and routers use radio waves to communicate. Those waves are sometimes strong enough to carry outside your house. If your network is unprotected, your information is begging to be hacked.
   
Many intruders already know this. They'll drive through neighborhoods searching for stray signals with radio equipment. With the right information, they could access your networked computers and files. They could even borrow your Internet connection.

Hackers search for people who use the default factory settings. Those settings usually include low or no security. You can start protecting your network by reconfiguring your wireless router.

But most folks don't even know how to change the router's configuration. I'm going to put you on the right track. The descriptions that follow are general, because different brands require different steps.

Finding your router's settings

Most wireless routers are configured through a browser such as Internet Explorer. First, you need to connect your wireless router to a computer. Yes, you're already connected through your network. You can otherwise connect directly with an Ethernet cable. Ethernet cables look like telephone cords with large-sized plugs.
   
Now open your Internet browser. To communicate with the router, you'll need its IP address. You can find this in your manual under a heading like "configuration setup" or "manual configuration." Most routers, for example, have an IP address like 192.168.0.1.

Treat that number as a Web address. Type it directly into your Internet browser's address bar. You'll then be prompted for a user name and password. These will also be listed in your manual.

Finally, you'll see your router's configuration tool. It looks a lot like an ordinary Web page. Now, let's work on security.

Changing your router's settings

Wireless router default settings often disregard security. That's because low security makes it forgiving and easy to install. But now you can eliminate the risky downside of easy installation. Change your router's settings to add a strong layer of security. Different brands put these settings under different menus. But you should be able to find each without trouble.

The best way to protect your wireless network is through encryption. Use WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access) for your encryption setting. You'll typically see this setting as WPA-PSK (pre-shared key). You'll be prompted to enter a passphrase of eight to 63 characters--letters, numbers and symbols. The router will use your passphrase to build an encryption key.

WPA2 is the latest and safest version of WPA. It uses AES (Advanced Encryption Standard), one of the few standards approved by the U.S. government. The only weak point of WPA2 is your passphrase. So make it as strong as possible. Here are some tips:
• Use at least 20 characters.
• Avoid words found in a dictionary.
• Include letters, numbers and symbols.
   
If your router supports only WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy), you're not protected. WEP encryption can be cracked within minutes using a few simple tools. Look for updates on the router manufacturer's Web site. If you find no updates for WPA2, it's time for a new router.

Look for a router that is Wi-Fi CERTIFIED for WPA2. Certified routers conform to the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) standard 802.11i. You can find out more about WPA2 certification at the Wi-Fi Alliance Web site. Keep in mind that the computers on your network also need WPA2 compatibility. Check for updates before resorting to new network adapters.

Changing your computers' settings

Now your router is switched to use WPA2 encryption. But your computers don't yet know what you've done. You'll have to update them with the new setup. Here's what to do for each computer you've got on the network:

Click Start>>Control Panel. Double-click Network Connections. Right-click Wireless Network Connection. Select Properties from the pop-up menu. Select the Wireless Networks tab. Under "Preferred networks," you should see your network listed. Select it and click Properties. If it's not listed, click the Add button. In the box labeled "Network name (SSID)," enter your network's name.

Under Network Authentication, select WPA-PSK. Under "Data encryption," select AES. Under "Network key," enter the same passphrase you used for your router. You'll have to enter it twice to confirm it. Then make sure that the checkbox labeled "The key is provided for me automatically" is not marked. Finally, click OK>>OK.

Windows 98 and Me do not have built-in wireless networking. All of the wireless menu options are provided by your wireless adapter software. Each brand implements its features differently. But most should add wireless options to the same place.

And that's all there is to it! Well, OK, it takes a while to get it done. But encryption makes you a less attractive target for hackers. And if your neighbors were secretly using your Internet service, they've just lost their connection.
___________________________

I have a wireless (Wi-Fi) setup at home. Apparently, the guy next
door is using it! How can I be sure the he doesn't have access?

A. You can't. Wi-Fi is notorious for its lack of security.
But you can make changes that will discourage all but the most
determined intruders.

Wi-Fi has an encryption protocol called Wired Equivalent Privacy.
Unfortunately, the key used by WEP can be decoded by specialized
software in an hour or two. But you should check your manual and
enable WEP anyway. It's better than nothing.

Change the WEP key occasionally. And don't use a default key.
A competent hacker already knows it.

Change the network's name in the SSID (Service Set ID). Every
hacker knows the default names. And don't use your name--that will
allow someone to identify the network. If possible, turn off the
broadcast function. With this disabled, the individual computers'
SSIDs must match that in the base station. That will make it harder
for strangers to get in.

Identify each of your computers with a Media Access Control number.
You list these with your access point. The access point then will
accept only the correct numbers. Someone determined to get in might
pick up these numbers by watching traffic. But this will keep out
casual intruders.

If you have a router, be sure the firewall is enabled. These
firewalls are very strong. A good firewall will make your network
virtually invisible.

Hope this helps. I'll see you tomorrow with another great tip!
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