Author Topic: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?  (Read 56334 times)

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Then it either died, or is dying and you scratch your head and ask why, right?
Well, blame it on the envirofreaks/EPA, they mandated 10% ethanol, a corrosive, destructive little culprit that not only eats rubber, but robs your engine of power.
I will tell you of my horror story in a couple of days.

I should have put this in Scams, because that is all it is, one big ass Scam!

And the worst gasoline-ethanol blend out there is E10, which is also the most common. Just how bad is ethanol for a small engine? Well, statute law exempts all airplanes from using ethanol-blended fuel. Why? What's the worst that could happen? As an aside, most piston driven aircraft burn 100-110 octane "low-lead" gasoline specifically defined as "aviation gas."

E10 has a "shelf life" of about two to three months. After that, the alcohol begins separating from the gasoline, forming a second layer in your fuel tank. This process is known as "phase separation." And if you live in a colder climate with damp snowy winters, E10 spoils even faster. Once this happens, the alcohol also begins attracting water, which eventually forms a third layer in your fuel tank. This is particularly problematic for the two-cycle gas you use in your weed whacker or chainsaw, as these devices usually aren't operated frequently enough to use up all of the two-cycle gas you have on hand.

Over time, your two-cycle fuel becomes progressively more contaminated. And as this happens, ethanol also begins rotting away the rubber or vinyl hoses on your engine, like the fuel lines. Worse yet, that dissolved rubber or vinyl gets sent into the cylinders. When combustion occurs, those contaminants form a gooey sludge, which robs engine performance, damages the pistons, and eventually will destroy the small engine. So what's the solution?

There are several things you can do to prevent ethanol-blended gasoline from wrecking your power equipment.

    * Buy fresh fuel on a regular basis. Unless you have an expansive lawn, ditch the five-gallon gas can and replace it with a smaller one. That way, you'll use the fuel up faster.

    * If your plastic jerry can is several years old, replace it. Most likely the ethanol has begun dissolving the inside surface, putting even more gunk into your gasoline.

    * It may take a bit of searching, but some gas stations sell ethanol-free gasoline. Find one.

    * As winter approaches and you put away your weed whacker/chainsaw until spring, get rid of the fuel in the tanks and refill them with ethanol-free gasoline. Additionally, don't let your remaining two-cycle gas "winter over." Give it to someone who can use it up, or someone you don't like very much.

    * If there is a small airport nearby, try to buy some exempt 100 octane gasoline there. It's illegal for the airport to fill up your car's gas tank, but you can usually purchase a jerry can or two. It's a bit pricey, but cheaper than replacing your power equipment.

    * Avoid any fuel additive containing alcohol, such as ethanol, methanol (wood alcohol), or isopropyl (rubbing alcohol). All alcohol attracts and retains water.

    * If own an older antique car, try to purchase 110 octane "low-lead" aviation gas. Many older V-8 engines were designed to run on 100 octane fuel. So blend some 110 with conventional premium grade gasoline. Your engine will have more power and get better mileage. Don't fill the entire tank with 110; it will burn up your valves, but a 50:50 mix works great. It's what I burn in my '63 Pontiac Bonneville.
http://www.stretcher.com/stories/10/10sep27d.cfm


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Online walkstall

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2010, 08:23:32 PM »
I have had no problem with my chainsaw, lawnmower, weedeater, blower, rideing mower and two Honda generators.   I use a fuel stabilizer (Sta Bil) in all my gas, I double the amount it call for.  I have used gas that is 6 month old with no problems.  I have spark plug that are over 6 years old in each. 

I feel the fuel stabilizer has save me a lot of time and money over the last 15+ years.  I have yet to have something not start up on 3 to 5 pulls after winter.  But then I keep them in a 40º garage in the winter.

I learned the hard way on my 1965 Chevy Impala convertible  :o  about ethanol.  I had just put on my first Electric Fuel Pump at a cost of 110$ at the time.  Two tank and two week later I had to replace all my rubber from the gas tank all the way up to the four-barrel carburetor, the carburetor I had to rebuild.  I was not a happy camper. 


Check it out you may like it STA-Bil
A politician thinks of the next election. A statesman, of the next generation.- James Freeman Clarke

Politics is supposed to be the second-oldest profession.  I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first.  ~ Ronald Reagan ~

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Online Solar

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2010, 09:04:47 PM »
Check this out, it is all about Sta-bil, I'm switching to the Marine version. :o
I discovered that if you have a poly gas can older than 3 years, it can dissolve and clog up your fuel system if you use it.
I had one that was full of gas, and the damned thing rotted out after a year, the gas had gone bad, even with Stabil in it, but I thought I would save it to start fires, never got the chance before it rotted out the container. >:(

The 411 on Ethanol

Everything you need to know about the Ethanol in your fuel and your equipment!

When it comes to Ethanol-blended gasoline, and the effects it can have on fuel systems and your equipment, you most likely have more questions than answers. Below is a list of articles and links, providing you the “411”on Ethanol to help answer all of your Ethanol-related questions - from the history of Ethanol–blended fuels, to helpful tips on how to protect your equipment from the damaging effects ethanol can cause.


http://www.goldeagle.com/engine_care/411onethanol.aspx
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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2010, 09:43:30 PM »
Check this out, it is all about Sta-bil, I'm switching to the Marine version. :o

So I take it you will be using this from now on.   We also use it in all 15 of the tractors diesel fuel over the winter.
I use it in my 2500 Ram also my quad.  I have a gal. of stabilizer with me at all times. 
A politician thinks of the next election. A statesman, of the next generation.- James Freeman Clarke

Politics is supposed to be the second-oldest profession.  I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first.  ~ Ronald Reagan ~

Always remember "Feelings Aren't Facts."

Online Solar

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2010, 07:47:13 AM »
So I take it you will be using this from now on.   We also use it in all 15 of the tractors diesel fuel over the winter.
I use it in my 2500 Ram also my quad.  I have a gal. of stabilizer with me at all times.
Yep, I was using regular Stabil, but it only works for about 5 months, against the ethanol.
But what I'm going to do in addition to the Marine Stabil, is go to the airport and get aviation fuel, the law doesn't force them to screw up engines with bad gas.
At least I can get 110 octane level and my quad will run like it was designed to do.
I guess ethanol can suck valves, and burn out rings, I have several small engines that I suspect suffered the fate of the evil ethanol additive.
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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2010, 07:55:49 AM »
Yep, I was using regular Stabil, but it only works for about 5 months, against the ethanol.
But what I'm going to do in addition to the Marine Stabil, is go to the airport and get aviation fuel, the law doesn't force them to screw up engines with bad gas.
At least I can get 110 octane level and my quad will run like it was designed to do.
I guess ethanol can suck valves, and burn out rings, I have several small engines that I suspect suffered the fate of the evil ethanol additive.

I am lucky my next door neighber has his own airport runway and aviation fuel tanks and that only a ½ mile away.  ;D
A politician thinks of the next election. A statesman, of the next generation.- James Freeman Clarke

Politics is supposed to be the second-oldest profession.  I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first.  ~ Ronald Reagan ~

Always remember "Feelings Aren't Facts."

tbone0106

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2010, 01:02:49 AM »
Now fellas, let's not overlook the wonderfulness of ethanol. Our federal government, as usual, detected it LONG before we rubes did....

After we taxpayers subsidize it at 40 cents/gallon, ethanol is only a little more expensive than gasoline!

While it's eating the rubber gaskets out of your fuel system, ethanol is producing roughly 17% less energy per gallon than regular gas.

With the government forcing oil companies to use it, ethanol production -- and the associated artificial demand for corn -- has wreaked havoc on the agricultural commodities market and cause shocking inflation of food prices. Five minutes of research on the uses of corn will enlighten you as to why this happens.

The artificial manipulation of the corn market, and the resultant shift of acreage to corn production, has directly inflated prices for other crops, most notably soybeans and wheat.

I've always said that government exists to do the things that a rational individual would never do. Ethanol is a perfect example of this principle.

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2010, 07:59:49 AM »
Now fellas, let's not overlook the wonderfulness of ethanol. Our federal government, as usual, detected it LONG before we rubes did....

After we taxpayers subsidize it at 40 cents/gallon, ethanol is only a little more expensive than gasoline!

While it's eating the rubber gaskets out of your fuel system, ethanol is producing roughly 17% less energy per gallon than regular gas.

With the government forcing oil companies to use it, ethanol production -- and the associated artificial demand for corn -- has wreaked havoc on the agricultural commodities market and cause shocking inflation of food prices. Five minutes of research on the uses of corn will enlighten you as to why this happens.

The artificial manipulation of the corn market, and the resultant shift of acreage to corn production, has directly inflated prices for other crops, most notably soybeans and wheat.

I've always said that government exists to do the things that a rational individual would never do. Ethanol is a perfect example of this principle.
;D ;D ;D ;D
Well played Tbone.
Lets not forget the one added value we all overlook, poorer MPG...
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tbone0106

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2010, 05:02:55 PM »
;D ;D ;D ;D
Well played Tbone.
Lets not forget the one added value we all overlook, poorer MPG...

You betcha!

Actually, I think I said that already, but I failed to say it in those terms....

Lower energy yield = lower MPG, by around 17%.

It's good to find a crowd that can see this stuff!

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2010, 05:35:43 PM »
You betcha!

Actually, I think I said that already, but I failed to say it in those terms....

Lower energy yield = lower MPG, by around 17%.

It's good to find a crowd that can see this stuff!
And for one very good reason, it's low heat output.
It's damn near half.

Gasoline:
1 Gal Gasoline (mid grade) = 125,000 Btu's

Ethanol:
1 Gal Ethanol = 76,000 Btu's

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tbone0106

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2010, 01:38:14 AM »
And for one very good reason, it's low heat output.
It's damn near half.

Gasoline:
1 Gal Gasoline (mid grade) = 125,000 Btu's

Ethanol:
1 Gal Ethanol = 76,000 Btu's

Cost of producing 1 Gal Ethanol = 96,000 BTUs

Cost of producing 1 Gal Gasoline = 22,000 BTUs

I am not making this up.

And I was wrong in my earlier post. The taxpayer subsidy for a gallon of ethanol is 45 cents, not 40. My bad.

tbone0106

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2010, 01:54:08 AM »
With my two-cycle stuff, at least the weedeaters and the chainsaws that I know I'm not going to use for a while, I just drain the fuel systems and remove the carburetors. A few squirts of carb cleaner, and they're good to go for the winter. Come spring, all is well.

My two-cycle snow-thrower is about to be reassembled right now.

I love two-cycle power equipment for lots of reasons. First, the power-to-weight ratio is AWESOME. Second, I love the sound, the louder the better! (You should hear my circa-1970 Homelite XL12 when I fire it up with a hefty dose of 16:1 mix!) Third, the two-cycle system has so FEW moving parts!


tbone0106

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2010, 01:57:26 AM »
Cost of producing 1 Gal Ethanol = 96,000 BTUs

Cost of producing 1 Gal Gasoline = 22,000 BTUs

I am not making this up.

And I was wrong in my earlier post. The taxpayer subsidy for a gallon of ethanol is 45 cents, not 40. My bad.

Oh, wait. I guess that's EVERYBODY'S bad.

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2010, 06:49:12 AM »
With ya on all of the above Mr.T  8)

I had all but forgotten just how loud 2 strokes used to be, my dad had an old Homelite or Echo chainsaw, back in 62 and I remember spending the entire day loading wood, all the while trying to cover my ears.

But you're right, there is nothing like the power factor.
My only issue is with the starting, my Stihll has so much torque, that if it doesn't start by the 4th pull, my shoulder goes out.
I'm sitting here with the pain now, I didn't check the gas yesterday, and was pulling a dry cord for nothing.
I've gotten in the habit of running it dry and putting it away empty, after having so damned many issues, (All Thanks To Ethanol Bull Shit!), ate my fuel lines, (not all at the same time) ate the gasket in the fuel cap, corroded the gasket in the carb, and ruined my favorite poly gas tank I've had for years.
I wish I could take the Gov to court over all this, they are ruining everything!

Don't get me started on the damage to my Quad runner. >:(
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tbone0106

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Re: Do You Own A Small Engine Like a Chainsaw, Lawnmower, Weedeater?
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2011, 10:30:01 PM »
Another issue with ethanol is its tendency to degrade rubber. I know you mentioned gaskets, but I'm referring specifically to the rubber "flap valves" in two-cycle fuel systems that serve to vent the fuel tank. For instance, on my 1972-vintage Pioneer 3071, the rubber "flap valve" is located in the fuel cap, which screws into the side of the tank. The ethanol-based gas has eaten the rubber to dust, and because of the saw's design, I can't run it now with more than half a tank of fuel and I can't turn it sideways toward the cap without dribbling mixed gas all over the ground, my boots, whatever. Of course, with Pioneer being out of business for all these years, replacement parts simply don't exist any more.

It's kinda like trying to find replacement parts for my arthritic hands and wrists... they don't make that model any more!  :D :P :P

 

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