Author Topic: All things electrical and lighting related  (Read 1130 times)

Offline Bassman

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All things electrical and lighting related
« on: December 09, 2012, 06:08:01 AM »
Although I am not an electrician, I do work in the industry and have spoken with electricians about various things related.  So, if you have questions related to anything electrical, feel free to ask and I'll try to get the best answer to you.


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Offline kramarat

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Re: All things electrical and lighting related
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2012, 06:17:56 AM »
Although I am not an electrician, I do work in the industry and have spoken with electricians about various things related.  So, if you have questions related to anything electrical, feel free to ask and I'll try to get the best answer to you.

Cool!

Same here, with any questions related to paint and finishing. Been at it for almost 30 years. Commercial, industrial, residential, automotive, furniture and cabinet finishes, and everything in between.

Online Solar

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Re: All things electrical and lighting related
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2012, 06:39:52 AM »
Same here, decades in the alternative energy field as a Defense contractor, from design to installation.
Retired now, but will live on solar till the day I die.
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Offline JustKari

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Re: All things electrical and lighting related
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2012, 12:05:43 PM »
Cool!

Same here, with any questions related to paint and finishing. Been at it for almost 30 years. Commercial, industrial, residential, automotive, furniture and cabinet finishes, and everything in between.

I have a question, my husband and I are re-using my grandparents cabinets, but they need to be refinished, I don't want to attempt to match the stain, and it is too dark anyway.  I will also be buying some new and unfinished.

1) Does a regular sander work fine to remove the stain, and to I have to remove all the stain to paint over it?

2) What is the best technique for a durable, streak-free paint finish, do you roll it, brush it, spray it, or spray and back roll to get the best look? 

Thanks in advance, I have been thinking about this for a few weeks, and just don't want to mess it up.

To add to the thread, I have edited two books, I will be working on my third in January. I am just starting out in this, so all of the work I do is free right now.  If anyone wants me to take a look at their writing, just message me and I will give you my contact information.

Offline kramarat

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Re: All things electrical and lighting related
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2012, 02:34:23 PM »
I have a question, my husband and I are re-using my grandparents cabinets, but they need to be refinished, I don't want to attempt to match the stain, and it is too dark anyway.  I will also be buying some new and unfinished.

1) Does a regular sander work fine to remove the stain, and to I have to remove all the stain to paint over it?

2) What is the best technique for a durable, streak-free paint finish, do you roll it, brush it, spray it, or spray and back roll to get the best look? 

Thanks in advance, I have been thinking about this for a few weeks, and just don't want to mess it up.

To add to the thread, I have edited two books, I will be working on my third in January. I am just starting out in this, so all of the work I do is free right now.  If anyone wants me to take a look at their writing, just message me and I will give you my contact information.


You don't have to remove the stain at all if you're painting them.
If you have access to a sprayer, it would give you the best look. Prep is most important. Here's what I do.

1) Clean all existing cabinets with a degreaser, followed by a wipe down with clean water and a damp rag. More than once if they need it.

2) There's a possibility that the cabinets have been waxed. Give them a cleaning with ammonia. It cuts wax.

3) Sand them with 180 grit sandpaper, or use one of those synthetic steel wool pads from Home Depot. The object is to scratch up the surface and knock down the existing gloss.

4) Wipe them down again with a damp rag to remove the dust.

5) Prime with this. http://www.rustoleum.com/cbgproduct.asp?pid=217

6) Finish with any top of the line latex semi gloss. I like the Valspar from Lowes, but they are all close if you're using the good stuff. 2 or 3 thin coats is better than trying to finish them with one thick coat.

I can finish cabinets with a roller and backbrushing and make them free of brush marks, but it's not a job for the homeowner. Mask it off and rent or borrow a sprayer. Strain the paint first so you don't get any spits or clogs, and you may want to thin it just a little.. They sell 1 gallon strainer bags where you get your paint.

Offline JustKari

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Re: All things electrical and lighting related
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2012, 10:01:09 PM »
You don't have to remove the stain at all if you're painting them.
If you have access to a sprayer, it would give you the best look. Prep is most important. Here's what I do.

1) Clean all existing cabinets with a degreaser, followed by a wipe down with clean water and a damp rag. More than once if they need it.

2) There's a possibility that the cabinets have been waxed. Give them a cleaning with ammonia. It cuts wax.

3) Sand them with 180 grit sandpaper, or use one of those synthetic steel wool pads from Home Depot. The object is to scratch up the surface and knock down the existing gloss.

4) Wipe them down again with a damp rag to remove the dust.

5) Prime with this. http://www.rustoleum.com/cbgproduct.asp?pid=217

6) Finish with any top of the line latex semi gloss. I like the Valspar from Lowes, but they are all close if you're using the good stuff. 2 or 3 thin coats is better than trying to finish them with one thick coat.

I can finish cabinets with a roller and backbrushing and make them free of brush marks, but it's not a job for the homeowner. Mask it off and rent or borrow a sprayer. Strain the paint first so you don't get any spits or clogs, and you may want to thin it just a little.. They sell 1 gallon strainer bags where you get your paint.

Thank you!  I will post pictures when we are done.  Since we have to prime the whole house, we are purchasing a sprayer, it would take forever to roll that whole house in primer and then roll the paint too.

Offline kramarat

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Re: All things electrical and lighting related
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2012, 03:32:20 AM »
Thank you!  I will post pictures when we are done.  Since we have to prime the whole house, we are purchasing a sprayer, it would take forever to roll that whole house in primer and then roll the paint too.

Don't forget to check craigslist. You might find a good one for a couple hundred.

Have fun with it. And don't forget a box of good particle masks.

 

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