Author Topic: Orthodox Christianity  (Read 512 times)

Offline milos

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Orthodox Christianity
« on: January 27, 2018, 06:25:38 AM »
I thought this could be a neat and useful topic. I like to write about and discuss religion in order to understand it better myself and to learn more. And also, if you are looking for the most conservative Church, the Orthodox Church is surely the one. So, why not to merge conservative politics with conservative Christianity. :smile:

The name Orthodox Church, or also Eastern Orthodox or Greek Orthodox, has come only for historical reasons. I myself was shocked to find out, after decades of being an Orthodox Christian, that my Church is Catholic. :scared: Until I learned what meant to be a Catholic, and that both Orthodox and Catholic Churches claim to be Orthodox - meaning of true glory/faith, and Catholic - meaning universal. So, my Orthodox Church is One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic.

But still, there are so many Orthodox Christians believing being Catholic is evil, and not being aware they are also Catholics. This confusion has also come for historical reasons, because no separate Orthodox or Catholic Churches have ever been founded. Before the Great Schism, the Church was territorially organized into five Patriarchates: of Antioch, Jerusalem, Alexandria, Rome, and Constantinople. And in the beginning, the Patriarch of Alexandria was considered the Pope. When the cities of Antioch, Jerusalem, and Alexandria fell into Muslim hands, the only free Patriarchates that remained were the one of Rome and the one of Constantinople. The Patriarch of Rome wanted to be the Pope, but the Patriarch of Constantinople refused to recognize him that title, and so there was the Great Schism of 1054. The Patriarchs of Antioch, Jerusalem, and Alexandria supported the Patriarch of Constantinople, and so they were called the Eastern Orthodox by the Church in Rome, while the Church in Rome was called the Roman Catholic by these four Churches in the east. And later, Martin Luther protested against the Pope in Rome, and so the Protestant Church emerged.

The Orthodox Church is the only one that kept the original beliefs of the First Council of Nicaea in 325 and the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed of 381, and so it is the oldest and the most conservative Church, and therefore the original Church of Jesus Christ. The central part of the Orthodox Christian faith is the Holy Communion - Eucharist. Everything we do - reading the Bible, praying, fasting, repenting and confessing our sins, forgiving others their sins, attending the Divine Liturgy - has one goal - to prepare ourselves to take the Holy Communion - the body and the blood of Jesus Christ. And only Orthodox Christians are allowed to take the Eucharist in the Orthodox Church, because one must be fully prepared to taste Jesus. With tasting Jesus, we are becoming the body and the blood of Christ ourselves, restoring the connection with our Creator that Adam has lost by his original sin.

Here are few videos about Confession and Eucharist in the Orthodox Church.





A tour of an Orthodox church.



Orthodox Great Litany (from the Divine Liturgy). The priests are singing while saying prayers, because the angels are also constantly singing prayers to the Lord in the Heavens.



Nicene Creed (Orthodox Chant) - our Symbol of Faith.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2018, 07:02:27 AM by milos »
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Offline milos

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Re: Orthodox Christianity
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2018, 12:52:02 AM »
What Is the Orthodox Church? – Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick



5 Differences Between the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church



5 Differences Between Orthodoxy and Evangelicalism



5 Misconceptions About the Orthodox Church

"Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline Dave

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Re: Orthodox Christianity
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2018, 07:49:05 AM »
I thought this could be a neat and useful topic. I like to write about and discuss religion in order to understand it better myself and to learn more. And also, if you are looking for the most conservative Church, the Orthodox Church is surely the one. So, why not to merge conservative politics with conservative Christianity. :smile:

The name Orthodox Church, or also Eastern Orthodox or Greek Orthodox, has come only for historical reasons. I myself was shocked to find out, after decades of being an Orthodox Christian, that my Church is Catholic. :scared: Until I learned what meant to be a Catholic, and that both Orthodox and Catholic Churches claim to be Orthodox - meaning of true glory/faith, and Catholic - meaning universal. So, my Orthodox Church is One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic.

But still, there are so many Orthodox Christians believing being Catholic is evil, and not being aware they are also Catholics. This confusion has also come for historical reasons, because no separate Orthodox or Catholic Churches have ever been founded. Before the Great Schism, the Church was territorially organized into five Patriarchates: of Antioch, Jerusalem, Alexandria, Rome, and Constantinople. And in the beginning, the Patriarch of Alexandria was considered the Pope. When the cities of Antioch, Jerusalem, and Alexandria fell into Muslim hands, the only free Patriarchates that remained were the one of Rome and the one of Constantinople. The Patriarch of Rome wanted to be the Pope, but the Patriarch of Constantinople refused to recognize him that title, and so there was the Great Schism of 1054. The Patriarchs of Antioch, Jerusalem, and Alexandria supported the Patriarch of Constantinople, and so they were called the Eastern Orthodox by the Church in Rome, while the Church in Rome was called the Roman Catholic by these four Churches in the east. And later, Martin Luther protested against the Pope in Rome, and so the Protestant Church emerged.

The Orthodox Church is the only one that kept the original beliefs of the First Council of Nicaea in 325 and the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed of 381, and so it is the oldest and the most conservative Church, and therefore the original Church of Jesus Christ. The central part of the Orthodox Christian faith is the Holy Communion - Eucharist. Everything we do - reading the Bible, praying, fasting, repenting and confessing our sins, forgiving others their sins, attending the Divine Liturgy - has one goal - to prepare ourselves to take the Holy Communion - the body and the blood of Jesus Christ. And only Orthodox Christians are allowed to take the Eucharist in the Orthodox Church, because one must be fully prepared to taste Jesus. With tasting Jesus, we are becoming the body and the blood of Christ ourselves, restoring the connection with our Creator that Adam has lost by his original sin.

Here are few videos about Confession and Eucharist in the Orthodox Church.





A tour of an Orthodox church.



Orthodox Great Litany (from the Divine Liturgy). The priests are singing while saying prayers, because the angels are also constantly singing prayers to the Lord in the Heavens.



Nicene Creed (Orthodox Chant) - our Symbol of Faith.




Also being Orthodox, I would like to interject two corrections to your statement above.
1. the Eastern Orthodox is not Catholic, universal. 
St Ignatius was the first to use the word and it meant "whole" or "complete"  It has the meaning that each congregation, headed by a bishop was  the whole complete Body of Christ.  It has a Trinitarian meaning of many are one.  The universal understanding was made by the Roman Catholic Church and in the west it became the first meaning of the word.  The fact is that the RCC is neither roman or catholic. By the time of the break, the western part of the empire had been lost to the Huns for several hundred of years and had not been part of the Roman Empire.  Also, since the Roman Pope made himself the sole, absolute, authority and each congregation became a part of the whole, rather than a whole, it was no longer catholic either.  All bishops are no longer collegiate or equal in  the RCC.

The other is the break came historically in 1054,  It was not that the East opposed the Pope of Rome as a Patriarch but that they did not consider him as having absolute jurisdiction instead of primacy where all the Bishops are equals, including the Patriarchs but one has the representative headship.

Offline milos

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Re: Orthodox Christianity
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2018, 01:26:14 AM »
Also being Orthodox, I would like to interject two corrections to your statement above.
1. the Eastern Orthodox is not Catholic, universal. 
St Ignatius was the first to use the word and it meant "whole" or "complete"  It has the meaning that each congregation, headed by a bishop was  the whole complete Body of Christ.  It has a Trinitarian meaning of many are one.  The universal understanding was made by the Roman Catholic Church and in the west it became the first meaning of the word.  The fact is that the RCC is neither roman or catholic. By the time of the break, the western part of the empire had been lost to the Huns for several hundred of years and had not been part of the Roman Empire.  Also, since the Roman Pope made himself the sole, absolute, authority and each congregation became a part of the whole, rather than a whole, it was no longer catholic either.  All bishops are no longer collegiate or equal in  the RCC.

Hi, thank you for your comment and corrections. In the English translation, the Symbol of Faith says: "One Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church.", so it is Catholic, and I can't say it isn't, because the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed says it is. You are true in your explanation, and I assume that the word "Catholic" in this case means both - "whole" and "complete", that each congregation, headed by a bishop, is the whole and complete Body of Christ - and also "universal", that the Orthodox Church is general, all-inclusive, cosmic, truly representing the Christian universe. I was just playing with the fact that the Orthodox Church is also Catholic, at least in English language, and that many Orthodox Christians are not aware of it, and some also believing their Orthodox Church is nationally exclusive, which it's not.

It would be a good moment to post here a brief explanation of the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed.

https://oca.org/orthodoxy/the-orthodox-faith/doctrine-scripture/the-symbol-of-faith/nicene-creed

The other is the break came historically in 1054,  It was not that the East opposed the Pope of Rome as a Patriarch but that they did not consider him as having absolute jurisdiction instead of primacy where all the Bishops are equals, including the Patriarchs but one has the representative headship.

Yes, absolutely.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2018, 01:32:49 AM by milos »
"Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline Dave

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Re: Orthodox Christianity
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2018, 10:27:09 AM »
Hi, thank you for your comment and corrections. In the English translation, the Symbol of Faith says: "One Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church.", so it is Catholic, and I can't say it isn't, because the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed says it is. You are true in your explanation, and I assume that the word "Catholic" in this case means both - "whole" and "complete", that each congregation, headed by a bishop, is the whole and complete Body of Christ - and also "universal", that the Orthodox Church is general, all-inclusive, cosmic, truly representing the Christian universe. I was just playing with the fact that the Orthodox Church is also Catholic, at least in English language, and that many Orthodox Christians are not aware of it, and some also believing their Orthodox Church is nationally exclusive, which it's not.

It would be a good moment to post here a brief explanation of the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed.

https://oca.org/orthodoxy/the-orthodox-faith/doctrine-scripture/the-symbol-of-faith/nicene-creed

Yes, absolutely.
When one uses the word "Catholic" in a name or to emphasize words as in the Nicene Creed, then it is capitalized.  But it is the lower case use that gives its meaning.

Offline milos

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Re: Orthodox Christianity
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2018, 12:01:49 AM »
A video from a cute redheaded believer about the fasting in the Orthodox Church.



And one describing the sacrament of Confession in the Orthodox Church.

"Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline milos

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Re: Orthodox Christianity
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2018, 12:33:13 AM »
The Sign of the Cross, Icons, and Tradition in the Orthodox Church



Frederica Mathewes-Green on the Jesus Prayer

"Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline milos

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Re: Orthodox Christianity
« Reply #7 on: Today at 12:10:41 AM »
"Understanding the Orthodox Faith" is an introductory guide to learning the basics about the Orthodox faith. Ellinas Multimedia has combined interviews with Orthodox Priests along with beautiful photography inside Orthodox churches to teach you about the following:

When did the Orthodox faith begin?
Who was the founder of the Orthodox faith?
What is meant by Apostolic Succession?
What does Holy Tradition mean?
Why are there icons in Orthodox churches?
Are Orthodox Christians "saved?"
How does the Orthodox faith view the Virgin Mary?
Are Orthodox Christians "born again?"
Why is the Orthodox faith considered "the best kept secret?"

"Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far." - Thomas Jefferson

 

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