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Author Topic: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death  (Read 278 times)

Online Calypso Jones

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Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« on: May 17, 2020, 12:05:14 PM »
midwestapologetics.org/blog/?p=1631


The four Gospels highlight dozens of miracles performed by Jesus. We read about Him curing the sick, healing the disabled, casting out demons, controlling nature, and raising the dead. Sometimes, Jesus healed a person by merely speaking, as He did when healing the centurion’s servant in Matthew 8:5–13. In other instances He touched the person to heal, like the time He healed two blind men near Jericho in Matthew 20:29–34. But sometimes the manner in which He healed a person seems rather bizarre, such as when He healed the deaf and mute man by putting His fingers in the man’s ears and then spitting and touching the man’s tongue (Mark 7:33).

As weird as that healing seems, there is one miracle recorded in the Gospels that appears even stranger. And it is this particular miracle that has received a growing amount of attention from skeptics in recent years. Sandwiched between Matthew’s account of Christ’s Crucifixion and Resurrection is the only record we know about of the following event. With the exception of the tearing of the temple veil, no other biblical writer, and no other historian mention these strange details:

Then, behold, the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom; and the earth quaked, and the rocks were split, and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised; and coming out of the graves after His resurrection, they went into the holy city and appeared to many. (Matthew 27:51–53)

In the past few years, I have had numerous skeptics challenge my belief in Christ’s Resurrection on the basis that Matthew is the only person who recorded this event. After all, they argue, such a monumental miracle—“many” people being raised and appearing to people in Jerusalem—surely would have made the news of the day. In other words, there is no way that other ancient writers would have neglected to write about such an amazing event, so Matthew must have simply made it up.

How should we respond to such a claim? Should Christians be concerned that Matthew is the only biblical writer to mention this exceptional miracle? What impact might this argument have on belief in the physical Resurrection of Jesus Christ?

Why Only Matthew?

Without an explanation from the biblical writers, I cannot say with certainty why they chose to write what they did. Of course, my theological explanation is that the Holy Spirit did not choose to have the other biblical writers to mention it. Why might that be the case? I have an explanation that I think makes very good sense.
Before getting to that explanation, let’s quickly consider the position of the skeptic. If three or four of the Gospel writers had mentioned that many saints appeared to people in Jerusalem around the time of Christ’s Resurrection, would the skeptics accept it as historical? I think the answer is obvious: they would not. How do I know? Well, all four Gospels affirm that Jesus rose from the dead, but they do not believe it. So in a sense, this objection does not seem to be all that genuine for most of the people who raise it.

Now why is Matthew the only one to talk about this event? Matthew clearly wrote his Gospel to Jewish readers. He repeatedly emphasized the fulfillment of Old Testament passages. In just the first two chapters of his book, he explains four events occurred “to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet(s)” (Matthew 1:22–23; 2:15, 17, 23). He knew his readers were very familiar with the Old Testament.

In the passage in question, Matthew explains an event that took place in Jerusalem. Some of his readers may have even been familiar with it, either through firsthand knowledge or by hearing it from others. But I believe the reason that Matthew mentions it is that the Jews, with the exception of the Sadducees, believed that people would physically rise from the dead.

 They looked forward to a future resurrection, based on passages like Daniel 12:2, which states, “And many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, some to shame and everlasting contempt.” When Jesus spoke to Martha before raising her brother Lazarus, He said, “Your brother will rise again” (John 11:23). Consistent with normative Jewish belief of the day, she replied, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day” (John 11:24). Of course, Jesus had other plans and raised Lazarus moments later.
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Re: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2020, 12:52:54 PM »
very interesting. I've always found that bit of scripture fascinating and wondered about it.



midwestapologetics.org/blog/?p=1631


The four Gospels highlight dozens of miracles performed by Jesus. We read about Him curing the sick, healing the disabled, casting out demons, controlling nature, and raising the dead. Sometimes, Jesus healed a person by merely speaking, as He did when healing the centurion’s servant in Matthew 8:5–13. In other instances He touched the person to heal, like the time He healed two blind men near Jericho in Matthew 20:29–34. But sometimes the manner in which He healed a person seems rather bizarre, such as when He healed the deaf and mute man by putting His fingers in the man’s ears and then spitting and touching the man’s tongue (Mark 7:33).

As weird as that healing seems, there is one miracle recorded in the Gospels that appears even stranger. And it is this particular miracle that has received a growing amount of attention from skeptics in recent years. Sandwiched between Matthew’s account of Christ’s Crucifixion and Resurrection is the only record we know about of the following event. With the exception of the tearing of the temple veil, no other biblical writer, and no other historian mention these strange details:

Then, behold, the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom; and the earth quaked, and the rocks were split, and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised; and coming out of the graves after His resurrection, they went into the holy city and appeared to many. (Matthew 27:51–53)

In the past few years, I have had numerous skeptics challenge my belief in Christ’s Resurrection on the basis that Matthew is the only person who recorded this event. After all, they argue, such a monumental miracle—“many” people being raised and appearing to people in Jerusalem—surely would have made the news of the day. In other words, there is no way that other ancient writers would have neglected to write about such an amazing event, so Matthew must have simply made it up.

How should we respond to such a claim? Should Christians be concerned that Matthew is the only biblical writer to mention this exceptional miracle? What impact might this argument have on belief in the physical Resurrection of Jesus Christ?

Why Only Matthew?

Without an explanation from the biblical writers, I cannot say with certainty why they chose to write what they did. Of course, my theological explanation is that the Holy Spirit did not choose to have the other biblical writers to mention it. Why might that be the case? I have an explanation that I think makes very good sense.
Before getting to that explanation, let’s quickly consider the position of the skeptic. If three or four of the Gospel writers had mentioned that many saints appeared to people in Jerusalem around the time of Christ’s Resurrection, would the skeptics accept it as historical? I think the answer is obvious: they would not. How do I know? Well, all four Gospels affirm that Jesus rose from the dead, but they do not believe it. So in a sense, this objection does not seem to be all that genuine for most of the people who raise it.

Now why is Matthew the only one to talk about this event? Matthew clearly wrote his Gospel to Jewish readers. He repeatedly emphasized the fulfillment of Old Testament passages. In just the first two chapters of his book, he explains four events occurred “to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet(s)” (Matthew 1:22–23; 2:15, 17, 23). He knew his readers were very familiar with the Old Testament.

In the passage in question, Matthew explains an event that took place in Jerusalem. Some of his readers may have even been familiar with it, either through firsthand knowledge or by hearing it from others. But I believe the reason that Matthew mentions it is that the Jews, with the exception of the Sadducees, believed that people would physically rise from the dead.

 They looked forward to a future resurrection, based on passages like Daniel 12:2, which states, “And many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, some to shame and everlasting contempt.” When Jesus spoke to Martha before raising her brother Lazarus, He said, “Your brother will rise again” (John 11:23). Consistent with normative Jewish belief of the day, she replied, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day” (John 11:24). Of course, Jesus had other plans and raised Lazarus moments later.
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Offline drifter106

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Re: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2020, 01:58:06 PM »
yes....and this answer is there if a person just looks for it.

one minor clue...  SAINT CATHERINE EMMRICH
« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 02:03:59 PM by drifter106 »

Offline drifter106

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Re: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2020, 02:00:58 PM »
furthermore I will add this....the temple curtain was torn to indicate the covenant with God was such that it was "out with the old and in with the new"...thats probably the best way to explain it.  That meaning by the death of Christ a new convenant with mankind was created.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2020, 02:05:40 PM by drifter106 »

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Re: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2020, 12:27:25 AM »
It would be interesting to focus on the whereabouts of the variousl 11 Apostles immediately after the resurrection.  Who was out in public who fled, and who hunkered in the bunker.
I do not suggest that this is some known answer, just that it is a logical way to investigate how Matthew could have known this, while possibly the others were unsure or did not witness it. 
The second thing to think about would be Matthew's connections in Jerusalem.

Thinking outside the box, because there is more room out here.

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Online Calypso Jones

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Re: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2020, 08:48:17 AM »

Thinking outside the box, because there is more room out here.

I like that. 
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Re: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2020, 08:55:00 AM »
It would be interesting to focus on the whereabouts of the variousl 11 Apostles immediately after the resurrection.  Who was out in public who fled, and who hunkered in the bunker.
I do not suggest that this is some known answer, just that it is a logical way to investigate how Matthew could have known this, while possibly the others were unsure or did not witness it. 
The second thing to think about would be Matthew's connections in Jerusalem.

Thinking outside the box, because there is more room out here.

that is a good question. 

heraldsofrevival.org/the-impact-of-christs-resurrection-on-his-disciples-1

I'm going to look into that.   We know some of them were so despondent and upset and fearful that they had rather hunkered down....because the women went to the tomb early that morning and then ran back to the disciples who were together at some location.

and remember..Christ appeard to two and walked with them to Emmaus even though they did not recognize
him.   Jesus had time to gather them and get them together for the indwelling of the holy spirit after his ascension.  Thanks for the interesting question.
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Re: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2020, 09:52:58 AM »
midwestapologetics.org/blog/?p=1631


The four Gospels highlight dozens of miracles performed by Jesus. We read about Him curing the sick, healing the disabled, casting out demons, controlling nature, and raising the dead. Sometimes, Jesus healed a person by merely speaking, as He did when healing the centurion’s servant in Matthew 8:5–13. In other instances He touched the person to heal, like the time He healed two blind men near Jericho in Matthew 20:29–34. But sometimes the manner in which He healed a person seems rather bizarre, such as when He healed the deaf and mute man by putting His fingers in the man’s ears and then spitting and touching the man’s tongue (Mark 7:33).

As weird as that healing seems, there is one miracle recorded in the Gospels that appears even stranger. And it is this particular miracle that has received a growing amount of attention from skeptics in recent years. Sandwiched between Matthew’s account of Christ’s Crucifixion and Resurrection is the only record we know about of the following event. With the exception of the tearing of the temple veil, no other biblical writer, and no other historian mention these strange details:

Then, behold, the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom; and the earth quaked, and the rocks were split, and the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised; and coming out of the graves after His resurrection, they went into the holy city and appeared to many. (Matthew 27:51–53)

In the past few years, I have had numerous skeptics challenge my belief in Christ’s Resurrection on the basis that Matthew is the only person who recorded this event. After all, they argue, such a monumental miracle—“many” people being raised and appearing to people in Jerusalem—surely would have made the news of the day. In other words, there is no way that other ancient writers would have neglected to write about such an amazing event, so Matthew must have simply made it up.

How should we respond to such a claim? Should Christians be concerned that Matthew is the only biblical writer to mention this exceptional miracle? What impact might this argument have on belief in the physical Resurrection of Jesus Christ?

Why Only Matthew?

Without an explanation from the biblical writers, I cannot say with certainty why they chose to write what they did. Of course, my theological explanation is that the Holy Spirit did not choose to have the other biblical writers to mention it. Why might that be the case? I have an explanation that I think makes very good sense.
Before getting to that explanation, let’s quickly consider the position of the skeptic. If three or four of the Gospel writers had mentioned that many saints appeared to people in Jerusalem around the time of Christ’s Resurrection, would the skeptics accept it as historical? I think the answer is obvious: they would not. How do I know? Well, all four Gospels affirm that Jesus rose from the dead, but they do not believe it. So in a sense, this objection does not seem to be all that genuine for most of the people who raise it.

Now why is Matthew the only one to talk about this event? Matthew clearly wrote his Gospel to Jewish readers. He repeatedly emphasized the fulfillment of Old Testament passages. In just the first two chapters of his book, he explains four events occurred “to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet(s)” (Matthew 1:22–23; 2:15, 17, 23). He knew his readers were very familiar with the Old Testament.

In the passage in question, Matthew explains an event that took place in Jerusalem. Some of his readers may have even been familiar with it, either through firsthand knowledge or by hearing it from others. But I believe the reason that Matthew mentions it is that the Jews, with the exception of the Sadducees, believed that people would physically rise from the dead.

 They looked forward to a future resurrection, based on passages like Daniel 12:2, which states, “And many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, some to shame and everlasting contempt.” When Jesus spoke to Martha before raising her brother Lazarus, He said, “Your brother will rise again” (John 11:23). Consistent with normative Jewish belief of the day, she replied, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day” (John 11:24). Of course, Jesus had other plans and raised Lazarus moments later.
The Jewish take on Mathew. Just found it interesting...

https://www.biblestudytools.com/cjb/matthew/
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Offline WMK

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Re: Did the Dead Rise and Walk in Jerusalem at Christ's death
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2020, 06:20:48 PM »
It would be interesting to focus on the whereabouts of the variousl 11 Apostles immediately after the resurrection.  Who was out in public who fled, and who hunkered in the bunker.
I do not suggest that this is some known answer, just that it is a logical way to investigate how Matthew could have known this, while possibly the others were unsure or did not witness it. 
The second thing to think about would be Matthew's connections in Jerusalem.

Thinking outside the box, because there is more room out here.

The time you’re referring occurred at the moment the crucifixion of Christ was completed.
At that particular time, the Apostles likely had no depth of understanding as to what had just transpired. Their whole universe was turned upside down, and all they could grasp was  their Messiah had just been murdered and placed in a tomb. It wasn’t until Christ raised Himself from the dead that further revelation and understanding was gained.

As for ‘suppositions’ their only value is one of intrigue and nothing more.

 

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