Author Topic: George Martin died...  (Read 3453 times)

Offline kalash

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Offline kit saginaw

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Re: George Martin died...
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2016, 03:41:53 PM »
R.I.P., GM...

Yeah, he was a pioneer acoustics-technician... Basically the first producer to add integral in-song sound-effects to tunes...  the submarine-effects in Yellow Submarine, etc. 

Norman Smith, Pink Floyd's producer, and Moody Blues producer, Tony Clarke, took that concept and ran hard with it.

That's why I sometimes post companion-vids here... as a tribute to those guys.

Offline milos

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Re: George Martin died...
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2016, 05:13:01 PM »
He was a great composer, and of course the most famous as a producer for giving a chance to The Beatles, he made a small music company at that time, called EMI, a giant. Here is one George Martin's composition from the album "Yellow Submarine".

"Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far." - Thomas Jefferson

Offline kalash

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Re: George Martin died...
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2016, 11:50:23 AM »

Offline kit saginaw

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Re: George Martin died...
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2016, 01:53:12 AM »
Dark year for rock music continues... Keith Emerson died.

Yeah, the passing of another pioneering genius.  I saw him on his first 3-or-4 tours with ELP, famous for playing 2 keyboards simultaneously... stabbing knives into a couple more, to keep keys pressed-down in the days before phase-technology.

Here he is with the London Symphony... kicking-over a Hammond L-100 and playing it from the inside...



His masterpiece:



boy, that takes me directly back to the smoky-haze of the Eastowne Theater and the Grande Ballroom...
R.I.P. Kieth


Offline Late-For-Lunch

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Re: George Martin died...
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2016, 01:01:55 PM »
George Martin - A lot of people don't know that Martin wrote most of the orchestral and other supplemental string music on Beatles recordings including A Day in the Life, She's Leaving Home, Revolution #9, and the 1920s style arrangement of When I'm 64 . It was also Martin who encouraged the Beatles to think outside the box and to be unafraid to write music outside traditional formulae (such arrangements as with classical music included).
I personally think that A Day in the Life may be one of the greatest pieces of modern rock music ever written - and much of that is all George Martin. Fifth Beatle indeed.

- Speaking of some of the greatest rock music of all time, what an odd ending for Keith Emerson. He had his share of health, relationship and financial problems apparently,  but nothing that indicates to my non-expert eye that it warranted pulling the "emergency exit" handle for the Material Plane.

He'd previously got surgery for some nasty nerve condition that kept him from performing some years ago, thought it might be fixed but then it apparently recurred. Maybe he figured that he needed to be in top form to earn the sort of money he felt he needed for a decent retirement (probably didn't want to give music lessons to make ends meet). Just weird. RIP. He was indeed a lucky man. Most classically-trained pianists, even very talented capable ones, don't earn nearly as much in a lifetime as he.

What I liked about Emerson's musicianship was the seemingly limitless depth of moods / textures he could create with keyboards. His mastery of computer-assisted sound was unparalleled. When so many other rock  keyboard players were relying heavily on flash (like Edgar Winter, Rick Wakeman, Patrick Moraz) Emerson more often than not stayed true to his classical roots and went for innovative technique, style and coloration over flash in compositions / album production.

The record Tarkus (shown above) is a great example of that as is Brain Salad Surgery. The song Karn Evil 9 is another classic that defines the genre as much as any song by Yes, Moody Blues, Genesis or King Krimson.

The lighter side of ELP Brain Salad Surgery was pleasantly portrayed with the inclusion of Benny the Bouncer as Emerson renderded a classic Honky-Tonk - just to make sure the album was not too ponderous or overly-serious.

 I read that Emerson once said in an interview that a few months before Jimi Hendrix died he had mentioned to Emerson that Jimi might be interested in working with him. The Moog synthesizer was just getting revved up and Emerson was on the cutting edge of applying that technology as well as sampling and wave-form. Hendrix had apparently tired of the Band of Gypsies / Experience line-up with only him as the lead instrument and wanted to try new directions. What a gas that would have been - Hendrix on guitar and Emerson on keyboard...
« Last Edit: March 14, 2016, 01:39:32 PM by Late-For-Lunch »
Get Out of the Way and Leave Me Alone (Nods to General Teebone)

Offline kit saginaw

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Re: George Martin died...
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2016, 03:37:03 PM »
Yeah, Emerson and Hendrix would've been an excellent foundation for a collaboration... probably having to 'solve' the direction on where a lyricist/singer might take them.  A great portion of their projected fan-base wouldn't settle for anything other than Hendrix's vocals... who could've easily stayed in gypsy-Barbarella mode. 

Both musicians seemed fond of flourishes as the gateway to chord-progressions.

-Cept they would've had to carve a parallel niche alongside Atomic Rooster, who was experimenting with a- for lack of a better word; soulful direction.  Chris Farlowe, I think.

Offline milos

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Re: George Martin died...
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2016, 01:14:28 PM »
I have come to this amazing music video of George Harrison's early acoustic version of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", with a specially commissioned string arrangement by the late Sir George Martin recorded in 2006, and I found it amazing, both the tune, the lyrics, the voice, and the video. The evocative video was directed by Dandypunk, Andre Kasten and Leah Moyer and was shot in the Love Theatre at the Mirage Hotel and at other locations in Nevada. All effects were created using projection mapping and captured live, in-camera. No post production CGI was used. Dancer: Eira Glover.



I look from the wings at the play you are staging
While my guitar gently weeps

As I'm sitting here doing nothing but aging
Still my guitar gently weeps...
"Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very far." - Thomas Jefferson

 

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