Author Topic: Who Is Phoebe Snetsinger? A Bird Watcher  (Read 859 times)

Offline Solar

  • -
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 54625
  • Gender: Male
Who Is Phoebe Snetsinger? A Bird Watcher
« on: June 09, 2016, 06:09:15 AM »
To Google, she must be some kind of Saint for listing over 8ooo birds, for them to celebrate her birthday of 85, despite her death, all the while ignoring real history.
Yeah, they are celebrating her history on their home page search engine....


1856
Mormon handcart pioneers depart for Salt Lake City
In an extraordinary demonstration of resolve and fortitude, nearly 500 Mormons leave Iowa City and head west for Salt Lake City carrying all their goods and supplies in two-wheeled handcarts. Of all the thousands of pioneer journeys to the West in the 19th century, few were more arduous than those undertaken by the so-called Handcart Companies from 1856 to 1860.

The secular and religious leader of the Mormons, Brigham Young, had established Salt Lake City as the center of a new Utah sanctuary for the Latter-day Saints in 1847. In subsequent years, Young worked diligently to encourage and aid Mormons who made the difficult overland trek to the Great Salt Lake. In 1856, however, a series of poor harvests left the church with only a meager fund to help immigrants buy wagons and oxen. Young suggested a cheaper mode of travel: “Let them come on foot with handcarts or wheelbarrows; let them gird up their loins and walk through and nothing shall hinder or stay them.”

Some of the pilgrims gave up. Two girls in one handcart group left to marry a pair of miners they met along the way. The majority, however, struggled on and eventually reached the Salt Lake Valley. Over the course of the next four years, some 3,000 Mormon converts made the overland journey by pushing and pulling heavy-laden handcarts. Better planning and the use of iron axles made the subsequent immigrations slightly easier than the first, and some actually made the journey more quickly than if they had used ox-drawn wagons. Still, once the church finances had recovered, Young’s followers returned to using conventional wagons. The handcart treks remained nothing less than heroic. One Mormon girl later estimated that she and her family had each taken over a million steps to reach their goal, pushing and pulling a creaking wooden handcart the entire way

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/mormon-handcart-pioneers-depart-for-salt-lake-city


Koolaid is for kids, TEA is for adults

 

Powered by EzPortal