Author Topic: Medal of Honor stories - no more boring reading!  (Read 1378 times)

Offline je_freedom

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Medal of Honor stories - no more boring reading!
« on: March 15, 2019, 02:28:11 PM »
Do your children think reading is boring?

If your children think reading is boring,
it's likely because
they've been given boring materials to read.
Considering today's school system, it wouldn't surprise me a bit.

Here is the solution to boring reading materials:
Have them visit
http://www.cmohs.org/recipient-archive.php
That's right.  Have them read
the things people did to earn the Medal of Honor.

If you go to the page
http://www.cmohs.org/recipient-archive.php
you will see a listing of 25 names per page.
There are 141 pages, which means
there are just over 3500 awardees listed.
Click on "view" at the right end of each line,
and a page containing that guy's story will come up.
The good reading material starts just after the word "citation."

Here's an example:
       _______

http://www.cmohs.org/recipient-detail/3077/zeamer-jay-jr.php

On 16 June 1943, Maj. Zeamer (then Capt.) volunteered as
pilot of a bomber on an important photographic mapping mission
covering the formidably defended area in the vicinity of Buka, Solomon Islands.
While photographing the Buka airdrome. his crew observed
about 20 enemy fighters on the field, many of them taking off.
Despite the certainty of a dangerous attack by this strong force,
Maj. Zeamer proceeded with his mapping run, even after the enemy attack began.
In the ensuing engagement,
Maj. Zeamer sustained gunshot wounds in both arms and legs, 1 leg being broken.
Despite his injuries, he maneuvered the damaged plane so skillfully that
his gunners were able to fight off the enemy during a running fight which lasted 40 minutes.
The crew destroyed at least 5 hostile planes, of which Maj. Zeamer himself shot down 1.
Although weak from loss of blood, he refused medical aid until the enemy had broken combat.
He then turned over the controls,
but continued to exercise command despite lapses into unconsciousness,
and directed the flight to a base 580 miles away.
In this voluntary action, Maj. Zeamer, with superb skill, resolution, and courage,
accomplished a mission of great value.
       _______

Many of the entries from the 1800s contain very little information.
But most of the more modern entries are at least as amazing as this one.
Happy reading!

Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice. And moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue.
-- Barry Goldwater

 

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